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dc.contributor.authorRowe, Meredith Lee
dc.contributor.authorGoldin-Meadow, S.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-14T15:58:52Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationRowe, M. L., and S. Goldin-Meadow. 2009. “Differences in Early Gesture Explain SES Disparities in Child Vocabulary Size at School Entry.” Science 323 (5916) (February 13): 951–953. .en_US
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13041217
dc.description.abstractChildren from low–socioeconomic status (SES) families, on average, arrive at school with smaller vocabularies than children from high-SES families. In an effort to identify precursors to, and possible remedies for, this inequality, we videotaped 50 children from families with a range of different SES interacting with parents at 14 months and assessed their vocabulary skills at 54 months. We found that children from high-SES families frequently used gesture to communicate at 14 months, a relation that was explained by parent gesture use (with speech controlled). In turn, the fact that children from high-SES families have large vocabularies at 54 months was explained by children’s gesture use at 14 months. Thus, differences in early gesture help to explain the disparities in vocabulary that children bring with them to school.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1126/science.1167025en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleDifferences in Early Gesture Explain SES Disparities in Child Vocabulary Size at School Entryen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalScienceen_US
dash.depositing.authorRowe, Meredith Lee
dc.date.available2014-10-14T15:58:52Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.1167025*
dash.contributor.affiliatedRowe, Meredith


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