Genomic imprinting and the evolutionary psychology of human kinship

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Genomic imprinting and the evolutionary psychology of human kinship

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Genomic imprinting and the evolutionary psychology of human kinship
Author: Haig, David Addison
Citation: Haig, David. 2011. “Genomic Imprinting and the Evolutionary Psychology of Human Kinship.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108, no. 2: 10878–10885.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Genomic imprinting is predicted to influence behaviors that affect individuals to whom an actor has different degrees of matrilineal and patrilineal kinship (asymmetric kin). Effects of imprinted genes are not predicted in interactions with nonrelatives or with individuals who are equally related to the actor's maternally and paternally derived genes (unless a gene also has pleiotropic effects on fitness of asymmetric kin). Long-term mating bonds are common in most human populations, but dissolution of marriage has always affected a significant proportion of mated pairs. Children born in a new union are asymmetric kin of children born in a previous union. Therefore, the innate dispositions of children toward parents and sibs are expected to be sensitive to cues of marital stability, and these dispositions may be subject to effects of imprinted genes.
Published Version: doi:10.1073/pnas.1100295108
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3131819/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13041329
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters