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dc.contributor.authorRosenblum, E. B.
dc.contributor.authorRompler, H.
dc.contributor.authorSchoneberg, T.
dc.contributor.authorHoekstra, Hopi E.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T17:27:51Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2014-07-12T11:28:33-04:00
dc.identifier.citationRosenblum, E. B., H. Rompler, T. Schoneberg, and H. E. Hoekstra. 2010. “Molecular and Functional Basis of Phenotypic Convergence in White Lizards at White Sands.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107 (5) (February 2): 2113–2117. doi:10.1073/pnas.0911042107. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0911042107.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13065014
dc.description.abstractThere are many striking examples of phenotypic convergence in nature, in some cases associated with changes in the same genes. But even mutations in the same gene may have different biochemical properties and thus different evolutionary consequences. Here we dissect the molecular mechanism of convergent evolution in three lizard species with blanched coloration on the gypsum dunes of White Sands, New Mexico. These White Sands forms have rapidly evolved cryptic coloration in the last few thousand years, presumably to avoid predation. We use cell-based assays to demonstrate that independent mutations in the same gene underlie the convergent blanched phenotypes in two of the three species. Although the same gene contributes to light phenotypes in these White Sands populations, the specific molecular mechanisms leading to reduced melanin production are different. In one case, mutations affect receptor signaling and in the other, the ability of the receptor to integrate into the melanocyte membrane. These functional differences have important ramifications at the organismal level. Derived alleles in the two species show opposite dominance patterns, which in turn affect their visibility to selection and the spatial distribution of alleles across habitats. Our results demonstrate that even when the same gene is responsible for phenotypic convergence, differences in molecular mechanism can have dramatic consequences on trait expression and ultimately the adaptive trajectory.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOrganismic and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1073/pnas.0911042107en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleMolecular and functional basis of phenotypic convergence in white lizards at White Sandsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2014-07-12T15:28:33Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.rights.holderRosenblum, E. B., H. Römpler, T. Schöneberg and H.E. Hoekstra
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dash.depositing.authorHoekstra, Hopi E.
dc.date.available2014-10-21T17:27:51Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0911042107*
workflow.legacycommentsper new osc interpretation can post puben_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedHoekstra, Hopi


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