Transient but not permanent benefit of neuronal progenitor cell therapy after traumatic brain injury: potential causes and translational consequences

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Transient but not permanent benefit of neuronal progenitor cell therapy after traumatic brain injury: potential causes and translational consequences

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Title: Transient but not permanent benefit of neuronal progenitor cell therapy after traumatic brain injury: potential causes and translational consequences
Author: Skardelly, Marco; Gaber, Khaled; Burdack, Swen; Scheidt, Franziska; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Hilbig, Heidegard; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Boltze, Johannes

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Citation: Skardelly, Marco, Khaled Gaber, Swen Burdack, Franziska Scheidt, Martin U. Schuhmann, Heidegard Hilbig, Jürgen Meixensberger, and Johannes Boltze. 2014. “Transient but not permanent benefit of neuronal progenitor cell therapy after traumatic brain injury: potential causes and translational consequences.” Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 8 (1): 318. doi:10.3389/fncel.2014.00318. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fncel.2014.00318.
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Abstract: Background:: Numerous studies have reported a beneficial impact of neural progenitor cell transplantation on functional outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) during short and medium follow-up periods. However, our knowledge regarding long-term functional effects is fragmentary while a direct comparison between local and systemic transplantation is missing so far. Objectives:: This study investigated the long-term (12 week) impact of human fetal neuronal progenitor cell (hNPC) transplantation 24 h after severe TBI in rats. Methods:: Cells were either transplanted stereotactically (1 × 105) into the putamen or systemically (5 × 105) via the tail vein. Control animals received intravenous transplantation of vehicle solution. Results: An overall functional benefit was observed after systemic, but not local hNPC transplantation by area under the curve analysis (p < 0.01). Surprisingly, this effect vanished during later stages after TBI with all groups exhibiting comparable functional outcomes 84 days after TBI. Investigation of cell-mediated inflammatory processes revealed increasing microglial activation and macrophage presence during these stages, which was statistically significant after systemic cell administration (p < 0.05). Intracerebral hNPC transplantation slightly diminished astrogliosis in perilesional areas (p < 0.01), but did not translate into a permanent functional benefit. No significant effects on angiogenesis were observed among the groups. Conclusion: Our results suggest the careful long-term assessment of cell therapies for TBI, as well as to identify potential long-term detrimental effects of such therapies before moving on to clinical trials. Moreover, immunosuppressive protocols, though widely used, should be rigorously assessed for their applicability in the respective setup.
Published Version: doi:10.3389/fncel.2014.00318
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4196631/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13347552
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