Why We Think We Can't Dance: Theory of Mind and Children's Desire to Perform

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Why We Think We Can't Dance: Theory of Mind and Children's Desire to Perform

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Title: Why We Think We Can't Dance: Theory of Mind and Children's Desire to Perform
Author: Chaplin, Lan Nguyen; Norton, Michael Irwin

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Chaplin, Lan Nguyen, and Michael I. Norton. "Why We Think We Can't Dance: Theory of Mind and Children's Desire to Perform." Child Development (forthcoming).
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Abstract: Theory of Mind (ToM) allows children to achieve success in the social world by understanding others' minds. A study with 3–12 year olds, however, demonstrates that gains in ToM are linked to decreases in children's desire to engage in performative behaviors associated with health and well-being—such as singing and dancing. One hundred and fifty nine middle-class children from diverse backgrounds in a northeastern USA metropolitan area completed the study in 2011. The development of ToM is associated with decreases in self-esteem, which in turn predicts decreases in children's willingness to perform. This shift away from performance begins at age 4 (when ToM begins to develop), years before children enter puberty.
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13348077
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