The associations of leg lean mass with foot pain, posture and function in the Framingham foot study

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The associations of leg lean mass with foot pain, posture and function in the Framingham foot study

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Title: The associations of leg lean mass with foot pain, posture and function in the Framingham foot study
Author: McLean, Robert R; Dufour, Alyssa B; Katz, Patricia P; Hillstrom, Howard J; Hagedorn, Thomas J; Hannan, Marian T

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Citation: McLean, Robert R, Alyssa B Dufour, Patricia P Katz, Howard J Hillstrom, Thomas J Hagedorn, and Marian T Hannan. 2014. “The associations of leg lean mass with foot pain, posture and function in the Framingham foot study.” Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 7 (1): 46. doi:10.1186/s13047-014-0046-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13047-014-0046-5.
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Abstract: Background: Foot disorders are common in older adults and associated with impaired lower extremity function. Reduced muscle mass may play a role in the etiology of foot disorders and consequent poor function. Methods: We examined the association of leg lean mass with foot pain, posture and function among 1,795 individuals (mean age 67 years) from the population-based Framingham Foot Study (2002–2008). Pain was assessed via questionnaire, and a pressure mat classified foot posture (arch: high, low, referent) during standing and function (pronation, supination, referent) during gait. Leg lean mass was measured by whole body dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results: In age- and body mass index-adjusted logistic (pain) and multinomial logistic (posture, function) regression models, a 1-standard deviation increase in leg lean mass was associated with lower odds of foot pain (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.86) and pronation (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.85), and higher odds of supination (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.31). Adjustment for sex attenuated these associations. Higher leg lean mass was associated with lower odds of high arch, even after adjustment for sex (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.89). Conclusions: Though not related to foot pain or function, reduced leg lean mass was associated with extreme foot posture in older adults. Loss of muscle mass with aging may thus play a role in the etiology of functional impairment due to foot disorders.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s13047-014-0046-5
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4232671/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13454642
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