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dc.contributor.authorEkwaru, John Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorZwicker, Jennifer D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHolick, Michael F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiovannucci, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorVeugelers, Paul J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-02T21:27:39Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationEkwaru, John Paul, Jennifer D. Zwicker, Michael F. Holick, Edward Giovannucci, and Paul J. Veugelers. 2014. “The Importance of Body Weight for the Dose Response Relationship of Oral Vitamin D Supplementation and Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Healthy Volunteers.” PLoS ONE 9 (11): e111265. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0111265. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0111265.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13454666
dc.description.abstractUnlike vitamin D recommendations by the Institute of Medicine, the Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Endocrine Society acknowledge body weight differentials and recommend obese subjects be given two to three times more vitamin D to satisfy their body's vitamin D requirement. However, the Endocrine Society also acknowledges that there are no good studies that clearly justify this. In this study we examined the combined effect of vitamin D supplementation and body weight on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH)D) and serum calcium in healthy volunteers. We analyzed 22,214 recordings of vitamin D supplement use and serum 25(OH)D from 17,614 healthy adult volunteers participating in a preventive health program. This program encourages the use of vitamin D supplementation and monitors its use and serum 25(OH)D and serum calcium levels. Participants reported vitamin D supplementation ranging from 0 to 55,000 IU per day and had serum 25(OH)D levels ranging from 10.1 to 394 nmol/L. The dose response relationship between vitamin D supplementation and serum 25(OH)D followed an exponential curve. On average, serum 25(OH)D increased by 12.0 nmol/L per 1,000 IU in the supplementation interval of 0 to 1,000 IU per day and by 1.1 nmol/L per 1,000 IU in the supplementation interval of 15,000 to 20,000 IU per day. BMI, relative to absolute body weight, was found to be the better determinant of 25(OH)D. Relative to normal weight subjects, obese and overweight participants had serum 25(OH)D that were on average 19.8 nmol/L and 8.0 nmol/L lower, respectively (P<0.001). We did not observe any increase in the risk for hypercalcemia with increasing vitamin D supplementation. We recommend vitamin D supplementation be 2 to 3 times higher for obese subjects and 1.5 times higher for overweight subjects relative to normal weight subjects. This observational study provides body weight specific recommendations to achieve 25(OH)D targets.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0111265en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4220998/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Sciencesen
dc.subjectMathematicsen
dc.subjectStatistics (Mathematics)en
dc.subjectStatistical Methodsen
dc.subjectRegression Analysisen
dc.subjectLinear Regression Analysisen
dc.subjectBiology and life sciencesen
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectNutrientsen
dc.subjectVitaminsen
dc.subjectVitamin Den
dc.subjectPhysiologyen
dc.subjectPhysiological Parametersen
dc.subjectBody Weighten
dc.subjectBody Mass Indexen
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectMathematical and Statistical Techniquesen
dc.titleThe Importance of Body Weight for the Dose Response Relationship of Oral Vitamin D Supplementation and Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Healthy Volunteersen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dc.date.available2014-12-02T21:27:39Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0111265*


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