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dc.contributor.authorLai, Pui Man Rosalinden_US
dc.contributor.authorDasenbrock, Hormuzdiyaren_US
dc.contributor.authorDu, Roseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-02T21:28:39Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationLai, Pui Man Rosalind, Hormuzdiyar Dasenbrock, and Rose Du. 2014. “The Association between Meteorological Parameters and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Nationwide Analysis.” PLoS ONE 9 (11): e112961. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112961. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112961.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13454760
dc.description.abstractPrior research has suggested that regional weather patterns impact the risk of rupture of cerebral aneurysms, but the findings in the literature have been inconsistent. Furthermore, no nationwide analysis to date has examined the association between meteorological factors and the post-procedural outcomes of patients after the treatment for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to use a nationwide sample to analyze the association between specific meteorological parameters—temperature, precipitation, sunlight, and humidity—and hospital admission rate for and outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients were identified using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2001–2010): Those with an ICD-9 diagnosis code for subarachnoid hemorrhage and a procedural code for aneurysm repair were included. Climate data were obtained from the State of the Climate Report 2010 released by the National Climatic Data Center. Multivariate regression models were constructed to analyze the association between average state monthly temperature, precipitation, and percent possible sunlight, as well as relative morning humidity and both monthly hospital admission rate, adjusted for annual state population in millions, and in-hospital mortality. 16,970 admissions were included from 723 hospitals across 41 states. Decreased daily sunlight and lower relative humidity were associated with an increased rate of admission for ruptured cerebral aneurysms (p<0.001), but had no association with differential inpatient mortality. No significant changes in these observed associations were seen when multivariate analyses were constructed. This is the first nationwide study to suggest that decreased sunlight and lower relative humidity are associated with admission for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. While it has been postulated that external atmospheric factors may cause hormonal and homeostatic changes that impact the risk of rupture of cerebral aneurysms, additional research is needed to confirm and further understand these relationships.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112961en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4231088/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectEarth Sciencesen
dc.subjectAtmospheric Scienceen
dc.subjectMeteorologyen
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectNeurologyen
dc.subjectCerebrovascular Diseasesen
dc.subjectVascular Medicineen
dc.subjectVascular Diseasesen
dc.subjectAneurysmsen
dc.titleThe Association between Meteorological Parameters and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Nationwide Analysisen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorDasenbrock, Hormuzdiyaren_US
dc.date.available2014-12-02T21:28:39Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0112961*
dash.contributor.affiliatedDasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar
dash.contributor.affiliatedDu, Rose


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