The Design Organization Test: Further Demonstration of Reliability and Validity as a Brief Measure of Visuospatial Ability

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The Design Organization Test: Further Demonstration of Reliability and Validity as a Brief Measure of Visuospatial Ability

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Title: The Design Organization Test: Further Demonstration of Reliability and Validity as a Brief Measure of Visuospatial Ability
Author: Killgore, William D. S.; Gogel, Hannah

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Citation: Killgore, William D. S., and Hannah Gogel. 2014. “The Design Organization Test: Further Demonstration of Reliability and Validity as a Brief Measure of Visuospatial Ability.” Applied Neuropsychology. Adult 21 (4): 297-309. doi:10.1080/23279095.2013.811671. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23279095.2013.811671.
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Abstract: Neuropsychological assessments are frequently time-consuming and fatiguing for patients. Brief screening evaluations may reduce test duration and allow more efficient use of time by permitting greater attention toward neuropsychological domains showing probable deficits. The Design Organization Test (DOT) was initially developed as a 2-min paper-and-pencil alternative for the Block Design (BD) subtest of the Wechsler scales. Although initially validated for clinical neurologic patients, we sought to further establish the reliability and validity of this test in a healthy, more diverse population. Two alternate versions of the DOT and the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) were administered to 61 healthy adult participants. The DOT showed high alternate forms reliability (r = .90–.92), and the two versions yielded equivalent levels of performance. The DOT was highly correlated with BD (r = .76–.79) and was significantly correlated with all subscales of the WASI. The DOT proved useful when used in lieu of BD in the calculation of WASI IQ scores. Findings support the reliability and validity of the DOT as a measure of visuospatial ability and suggest its potential worth as an efficient estimate of intellectual functioning in situations where lengthier tests may be inappropriate or unfeasible.
Published Version: doi:10.1080/23279095.2013.811671
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4235486/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13454784
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