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dc.contributor.authorSheridan, Margaret A.
dc.contributor.authorFox, N. A.
dc.contributor.authorZeanah, C. H.
dc.contributor.authorMclaughlin, K
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Charles A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-12T18:32:44Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationSheridan, M. A., N. A. Fox, C. H. Zeanah, K. A. McLaughlin, and C. A. Nelson. 2012. “Variation in Neural Development as a Result of Exposure to Institutionalization Early in Childhood.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109 (32) (July 23): 12927–12932.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13506927
dc.description.abstractWe used structural MRI and EEG to examine brain structure and function in typically developing children in Romania (n = 20), children exposed to institutional rearing (n = 29), and children previously exposed to institutional rearing but then randomized to a high-quality foster care intervention (n = 25). In so doing, we provide a unique evaluation of whether placement in an improved environment mitigates the effects of institutional rearing on neural structure, using data from the only existing randomized controlled trial of foster care for institutionalized children. Children enrolled in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project underwent a T1-weighted MRI protocol. Children with histories of institutional rearing had significantly smaller cortical gray matter volume than never-institutionalized children. Cortical white matter was no different for children placed in foster care than never-institutionalized children but was significantly smaller for children not randomized to foster care. We were also able to explain previously reported reductions in EEG α-power among institutionally reared children compared with children raised in families using these MRI data. As hypothesized, the association between institutionalization and EEG α-power was partially mediated by cortical white matter volume for children not randomized to foster care. The increase in white matter among children randomized to an improved rearing environment relative to children who remained in institutional care suggests the potential for developmental “catch up” in white matter growth, even following extreme environmental deprivation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1073/pnas.1200041109en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectneglecten_US
dc.subjectbrain developmenten_US
dc.subjectearly adversityen_US
dc.subjectbrain volumeen_US
dc.subjectearly experienceen_US
dc.titleVariation in neural development as a result of exposure to institutionalization early in childhooden_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dash.depositing.authorNelson, Charles A.
dc.date.available2014-12-12T18:32:44Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1200041109*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedMcLaughlin, Katie
dash.contributor.affiliatedSheridan, Margaret
dash.contributor.affiliatedNelson, Charles


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