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dc.contributor.authorTushnet, Mark V.
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-17T20:11:27Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.citationMark Tushnet, Research and the Justice Mission of Law Schools, 40 Clev. St. L. Rev. 463 (1992).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13548966
dc.description.abstractThere are some obvious things to say about research and the justice mission of law schools, and many other contributors to this discussion have said them. For example, jurisprudence lies at the core of the classical legal curriculum, and-at least in the contemporary law school-definitions of justice are part of the jurisprudence syllabus. Because the concept of justice is not self-defining, conceptual inquiry into the meaning of justice, a traditional mode of legal research, is recurrently needed. In this way, research is tightly linked to the justice mission of law schools. In this piece, I move from global concerns--jurisprudence in the classical sense-to concern with what happens in law school classrooms. At each level, I try to identify aspects of the law school's justice mission about which research is surely needed. In that way, I have tried to show that research is an inevitable part of that mission.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://engagedscholarship.csuohio.edu/clevstlrev/vol40/iss3/22/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleResearch and the Justice Mission of Law Schoolsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalCleveland State Law Reviewen_US
dash.depositing.authorTushnet, Mark V.
dc.date.available2014-12-17T20:11:27Z
workflow.legacycommentsDFen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedTushnet, Mark


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