Prenatal vitamin intake during pregnancy and offspring obesity

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Prenatal vitamin intake during pregnancy and offspring obesity

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Title: Prenatal vitamin intake during pregnancy and offspring obesity
Author: Dougan, Marcelle Maaza; Willett, Walter C.; Michels, Karin B.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Dougan, M M, W C Willett, and K B Michels. 2014. “Prenatal Vitamin Intake During Pregnancy and Offspring Obesity.” International Journal of Obesity (June 19). doi:10.1038/ijo.2014.107.
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Abstract: Background/Objectives: In animal studies, exposure to multi-vitamins may be associated with obesity in the offspring; however, data in humans is sparse. We therefore examined the association between prenatal vitamin intake during pregnancy and offspring obesity.
Subjects/Methods: We investigated the association between prenatal vitamin intake and obesity among 29 160 mother-daughter dyads in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Mothers of participants provided information on prenatal vitamin use during pregnancy with the nurse daughter. Information on body fatness at ages 5 and 10, body mass index (BMI) at age 18, weight in 1989 and 2009, waist circumference, and height was obtained from the daughter. Polytomous logistic regression was used to predict BMI in early adulthood and adulthood, and body fatness in childhood. Linear regression was used to predict waist circumference in adulthood.
Results: In utero exposure to prenatal vitamins was not associated with body fatness, either in childhood or adulthood. Women whose mothers took prenatal vitamins during pregnancy had a covariate-adjusted odds ratio of being obese in adulthood of 0.99 (95% CI 0.92–1.05, P-value=0.68) compared to women whose mothers did not take prenatal vitamins. Women whose mothers took prenatal vitamins during pregnancy had a covariate-adjusted odds ratio of having the largest body shape at age 5 of 1.02 (95% CI 0.90–1.15, P-value=0.78). In additional analyses, in utero exposure to prenatal vitamins was also unrelated to adult abdominal adiposity.
Conclusions: Exposure to prenatal vitamins was not associated with body fatness either in childhood or in adulthood.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/ijo.2014.107
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13566301
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