Psychological Sequelae of the Station Nightclub Fire: Comparing Survivors with and without Physical Injuries Using a Mixed-Methods Analysis

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Psychological Sequelae of the Station Nightclub Fire: Comparing Survivors with and without Physical Injuries Using a Mixed-Methods Analysis

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Title: Psychological Sequelae of the Station Nightclub Fire: Comparing Survivors with and without Physical Injuries Using a Mixed-Methods Analysis
Author: Trinh, Nhi-Ha T.; Nadler, Deborah L.; Shie, Vivian; Fregni, Felipe; Gilman, Stephen E.; Ryan, Colleen M.; Schneider, Jeffrey C.

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Citation: Trinh, Nhi-Ha T., Deborah L. Nadler, Vivian Shie, Felipe Fregni, Stephen E. Gilman, Colleen M. Ryan, and Jeffrey C. Schneider. 2014. “Psychological Sequelae of the Station Nightclub Fire: Comparing Survivors with and without Physical Injuries Using a Mixed-Methods Analysis.” PLoS ONE 9 (12): e115013. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0115013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0115013.
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Abstract: Background: Surveying survivors from a large fire provides an opportunity to explore the impact of emotional trauma on psychological outcomes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey of survivors of The Station Fire. Primary outcomes were post-traumatic stress (Impact of Event Scale – Revised) and depressive (Beck Depression Inventory) symptoms. Linear regression was used to examine differences in symptom profiles between those with and without physical injuries. The free-response section of the survey was analyzed qualitatively to compare psychological sequelae of survivors with and without physical injuries. Results: 104 participants completed the study survey; 47% experienced a burn injury. There was a 42% to 72% response rate range. The mean age of respondents was 32 years, 62% were male, and 47% experienced a physical injury. No significant relationships were found between physical injury and depressive or post-traumatic stress symptom profiles. In the qualitative analysis, the emotional trauma that survivors experienced was a major, common theme regardless of physical injury. Survivors without physical injuries were more likely to experience survivor guilt, helplessness, self-blame, and bitterness. Despite the post-fire challenges described, most survivors wrote about themes of recovery and renewal. Conclusions: All survivors of this large fire experienced significant psychological sequelae. These findings reinforce the importance of mental health care for all survivors and suggest a need to understand factors influencing positive outcomes.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0115013
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4275219/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13581059
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