Disrespect and Abuse During Childbirth in Tanzania: Are Women Living With HIV More Vulnerable?

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Disrespect and Abuse During Childbirth in Tanzania: Are Women Living With HIV More Vulnerable?

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Disrespect and Abuse During Childbirth in Tanzania: Are Women Living With HIV More Vulnerable?
Author: Sando, David; Kendall, Tamil; Lyatuu, Goodluck; Ratcliffe, Hannah; McDonald, Kathleen; Mwanyika-Sando, Mary; Emil, Faida; Chalamilla, Guerino; Langer, Ana

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Sando, David, Tamil Kendall, Goodluck Lyatuu, Hannah Ratcliffe, Kathleen McDonald, Mary Mwanyika-Sando, Faida Emil, Guerino Chalamilla, and Ana Langer. 2014. “Disrespect and Abuse During Childbirth in Tanzania: Are Women Living With HIV More Vulnerable?” Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (1999) 67 (Suppl 4): S228-S234. doi:10.1097/QAI.0000000000000378. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QAI.0000000000000378.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Introduction: HIV-related stigma and discrimination and disrespect and abuse during childbirth are barriers to use of essential maternal and HIV health services. Greater understanding of the relationship between HIV status and disrespect and abuse during childbirth is required to design interventions to promote women's rights and to increase uptake of and retention in health services; however, few comparative studies of women living with HIV (WLWH) and HIV-negative women exist. Methods: Mixed methods included interviews with postpartum women (n = 2000), direct observation during childbirth (n = 208), structured questionnaires (n = 50), and in-depth interviews (n = 18) with health care providers. Bivariate and multivariate regressions analyzed associations between HIV status and disrespect and abuse, whereas questionnaires and in-depth interviews provided insight into how provider attitudes and workplace culture influence practice. Results: Of the WLWH and HIV-negative women, 12.2% and 15.0% reported experiencing disrespect and abuse during childbirth (P = 0.37), respectively. In adjusted analyses, no significant differences between WLWH and HIV-negative women's experiences of different types of disrespect and abuse were identified, with the exception of WLWH having greater odds of reporting non-consented care (P = 0.03). None of the WLWH reported violations of HIV confidentiality or attributed disrespect and abuse to their HIV status. Provider interviews indicated that training and supervision focused on prevention of vertical HIV transmission had contributed to changing the institutional culture and reducing HIV-related violations. Conclusions: In general, WLWH were not more likely to report disrespect and abuse during childbirth than HIV-negative women. However, the high overall prevalence of disrespect and abuse measured indicates a serious problem. Similar institutional priority as has been given to training and supervision to reduce HIV-related discrimination during childbirth should be focused on ensuring respectful maternity care for all women.
Published Version: doi:10.1097/QAI.0000000000000378
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4251905/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13581071
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters