Secondhand smoke exposure assessment and counseling in the Chinese pediatric setting: a qualitative study

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Secondhand smoke exposure assessment and counseling in the Chinese pediatric setting: a qualitative study

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Title: Secondhand smoke exposure assessment and counseling in the Chinese pediatric setting: a qualitative study
Author: Liao, Jing; Abdullah, Abu S; Nong, Guangmin; Huang, Kaiyong; Lin, Longde; Ma, Zhenyu; Yang, Li; Zhang, Zhiyong; Winickoff, Jonathan P

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Citation: Liao, Jing, Abu S Abdullah, Guangmin Nong, Kaiyong Huang, Longde Lin, Zhenyu Ma, Li Yang, Zhiyong Zhang, and Jonathan P Winickoff. 2014. “Secondhand smoke exposure assessment and counseling in the Chinese pediatric setting: a qualitative study.” BMC Pediatrics 14 (1): 266. doi:10.1186/1471-2431-14-266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-14-266.
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Abstract: Background: Assisting smoking parents to quit smoking and eliminating the secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure of their children is a global health priority. Engaging healthcare workers in developing countries to address this priority has been a challenge. This study intends to explore issues around current practice related to SHS exposure assessment and counseling and identify barriers to SHS exposure reduction counseling in the Chinese pediatric setting. Methods: We conducted qualitative interviews (11 focus groups discussions (FGDs) with pediatricians, 6 FGDs with pediatric nurses and 11 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with hospital administrators) among 101 health-care professionals (HCP) from 5 hospitals in four major cities of Guangxi Province, China. All FGDs/ IDIs were audio recorded and analysed thematically. Results: The findings suggest that few Chinese pediatricians routinely address the SHS exposure of children in their usual practice. All HCPs felt the need for clinical interventions to promote SHS exposure reduction for children. Primary barriers to SHS exposure reduction counseling in the Chinese pediatric setting included: lack of skills and training in tobacco use reduction and cessation counseling; time constraints and heavy workloads, uncertainty about the usefulness of smoking cessation interventions and lack of hospital-wide systems requiring pediatricians to record tobacco use or SHS exposure information. Ideas for overcoming these barriers were building capacity of pediatricians, collaboration with international organization to initiate training, engaging top level leaders in the effort and ensuring financial resources to support the program. Conclusions: This study among hospital administrators and service providers in China demonstrated a high level of interest in delivering SHS exposure reduction interventions in the pediatric setting. The findings can inform the creation and delivery of clinical interventions in China to promote SHS exposure reduction to children in the pediatric setting. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1471-2431-14-266) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1471-2431-14-266
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4287587/pdf/
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13890686
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