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dc.contributor.authorStender, Johanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKupers, Ronen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodell, Andersen_US
dc.contributor.authorThibaut, Auroreen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatelle, Camilleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBruno, Marie-Aurélieen_US
dc.contributor.authorGejl, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorBernard, Claireen_US
dc.contributor.authorHustinx, Rolanden_US
dc.contributor.authorLaureys, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorGjedde, Alberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-02T15:32:55Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationStender, J., R. Kupers, A. Rodell, A. Thibaut, C. Chatelle, M. Bruno, M. Gejl, et al. 2015. “Quantitative rates of brain glucose metabolism distinguish minimally conscious from vegetative state patients.” Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism 35 (1): 58-65. doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.169. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2014.169.en
dc.identifier.issn0271-678Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13890708
dc.description.abstractThe differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) declines when consciousness is lost, and may reveal the residual cognitive function of these patients. However, no quantitative comparisons of cerebral glucose metabolism in VS/UWS and MCS have yet been reported. We calculated the regional and whole-brain CMRglc of 41 patients in the states of VS/UWS (n=14), MCS (n=21) or emergence from MCS (EMCS, n=6), and healthy volunteers (n=29). Global cortical CMRglc in VS/UWS and MCS averaged 42% and 55% of normal, respectively. Differences between VS/UWS and MCS were most pronounced in the frontoparietal cortex, at 42% and 60% of normal. In brainstem and thalamus, metabolism declined equally in the two conditions. In EMCS, metabolic rates were indistinguishable from those of MCS. Ordinal logistic regression predicted that patients are likely to emerge into MCS at CMRglc above 45% of normal. Receiver-operating characteristics showed that patients in MCS and VS/UWS can be differentiated with 82% accuracy, based on cortical metabolism. Together these results reveal a significant correlation between whole-brain energy metabolism and level of consciousness, suggesting that quantitative values of CMRglc reveal consciousness in severely brain-injured patients.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.169en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4294395/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectbrain injuryen
dc.subjectconsciousnessen
dc.subjectFDG-PETen
dc.subjectmetabolismen
dc.subjectminimally conscious stateen
dc.subjectvegetative stateen
dc.titleQuantitative rates of brain glucose metabolism distinguish minimally conscious from vegetative state patientsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolismen
dc.date.available2015-02-02T15:32:55Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/jcbfm.2014.169*
dash.authorsorderedfalse


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