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dc.contributor.authorMilinovich, Gabriel Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorAvril, Simon M Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorClements, Archie C Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrownstein, John Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, Shiluen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Wenbiaoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-02T15:33:01Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationMilinovich, Gabriel J, Simon M R Avril, Archie C A Clements, John S Brownstein, Shilu Tong, and Wenbiao Hu. 2014. “Using internet search queries for infectious disease surveillance: screening diseases for suitability.” BMC Infectious Diseases 14 (1): 690. doi:10.1186/s12879-014-0690-1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-014-0690-1.en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13890725
dc.description.abstractBackground: Internet-based surveillance systems provide a novel approach to monitoring infectious diseases. Surveillance systems built on internet data are economically, logistically and epidemiologically appealing and have shown significant promise. The potential for these systems has increased with increased internet availability and shifts in health-related information seeking behaviour. This approach to monitoring infectious diseases has, however, only been applied to single or small groups of select diseases. This study aims to systematically investigate the potential for developing surveillance and early warning systems using internet search data, for a wide range of infectious diseases. Methods: Official notifications for 64 infectious diseases in Australia were downloaded and correlated with frequencies for 164 internet search terms for the period 2009–13 using Spearman’s rank correlations. Time series cross correlations were performed to assess the potential for search terms to be used in construction of early warning systems. Results: Notifications for 17 infectious diseases (26.6%) were found to be significantly correlated with a selected search term. The use of internet metrics as a means of surveillance has not previously been described for 12 (70.6%) of these diseases. The majority of diseases identified were vaccine-preventable, vector-borne or sexually transmissible; cross correlations, however, indicated that vector-borne and vaccine preventable diseases are best suited for development of early warning systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that internet-based surveillance systems have broader applicability to monitoring infectious diseases than has previously been recognised. Furthermore, internet-based surveillance systems have a potential role in forecasting emerging infectious disease events, especially for vaccine-preventable and vector-borne diseases. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12879-014-0690-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/s12879-014-0690-1en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4300155/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.titleUsing internet search queries for infectious disease surveillance: screening diseases for suitabilityen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalBMC Infectious Diseasesen
dash.depositing.authorBrownstein, John Sen_US
dc.date.available2015-02-02T15:33:01Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12879-014-0690-1*
dash.contributor.affiliatedBrownstein, John


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