Characterization of aeroallergen sensitivities in children with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis

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Characterization of aeroallergen sensitivities in children with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis

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Title: Characterization of aeroallergen sensitivities in children with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis
Author: Sedaghat, Ahmad R.; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Cunningham, Michael J.

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Citation: Sedaghat, Ahmad R., Wanda Phipatanakul, and Michael J. Cunningham. 2014. “Characterization of aeroallergen sensitivities in children with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis.” Allergy & Rhinology 5 (3): e143-e145. doi:10.2500/ar.2014.5.0102. http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/ar.2014.5.0102.
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Abstract: Allergic rhinitis is a common comorbid condition in pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Testing for aeroallergen sensitization should therefore be considered in the evaluation of children with CRS. At present the aeroallergen sensitivity profile of children with CRS remains uncharacterized. In this study, we retrospectively identify a consecutive series of children with CRS and allergic rhinitis who have undergone joint otolaryngology and allergy evaluation at a single tertiary care center. We describe the aeroallergen sensitivity profiles (based upon formal skin testing) of these children, stratifying them according to co-morbidity status: 1) CRS with cystic fibrosis (CF), 2) CRS with immune deficiency and 3) uncomplicated CRS (without co-morbid CF, immune deficiency or primary ciliary dyskinesia). We identify 208 children (average age 9.3 years, standard deviation 4.8 years) with CRS and allergic rhinitis meeting inclusion criteria, 140 with uncomplicated CRS, 64 with co-morbid immune deficiency and 4 with co-morbid CF. The prevalence of indoor aeroallergen sensitivities (62.9–100.0%) was more common than that of outdoor aeroallergen sensitivities (43.8–50.0%) in all three cohorts of children. In all three cohorts, the most common indoor aeroallergen sensitivity was to dust mites (50.0–75.0%) and the most common outdoor aeroallergen sensitivity was to tree pollens (43.8–50.0%). The aeroallergen sensitivity profile of children with CRS and allergic rhinitis appears to be similar to that of the general pediatric population with allergic rhinitis, and parallels the aeroallergen sensitivities previously described for adults with CRS and allergic rhinitis. Knowledge of the aeroallergen sensitivities in children with CRS and allergic rhinitis will enhance both diagnostic and treatment strategies.
Published Version: doi:10.2500/ar.2014.5.0102
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4275460/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13890775
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