Propofol Infusion Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis at a Level 1 Trauma Center

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Propofol Infusion Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis at a Level 1 Trauma Center

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Title: Propofol Infusion Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis at a Level 1 Trauma Center
Author: Diaz, James H.; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Diaz, James H., Amit Prabhakar, Richard D. Urman, and Alan David Kaye. 2014. “Propofol Infusion Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis at a Level 1 Trauma Center.” Critical Care Research and Practice 2014 (1): 346968. doi:10.1155/2014/346968. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/346968.
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Abstract: Objectives. The propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS), a rare, often fatal, condition of unknown etiology, is defined by development of lipemic serum, metabolic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, hepatomegaly, cardiac arrhythmias, and acute renal failure. Methods. To identify risk factors for and biomarkers of PRIS, a retrospective chart review of all possible PRIS cases during a 1-year period was conducted at a level 1 trauma hospital in ICU patients over 18 years of age receiving continuous propofol infusions for ≥3 days. Additional study inclusion criteria included vasopressor support and monitoring of serum triglycerides and creatinine. Results. Seventy-two patients, 61 males (84.7%) and 11 females (15.3%), satisfied study inclusion criteria; and of these, 3 males met the study definition for PRIS, with 1 case fatality. PRIS incidence was 4.1% with a case-fatality rate of 33%. The mean duration of propofol infusion was 6.96 days. A positive linear correlation was observed between increasing triglyceride levels and infusion duration, but no correlation was observed between increasing creatinine levels and infusion duration. Conclusions. Risk factors for PRIS were confirmed as high dose infusions over prolonged periods. Increasing triglyceride levels may serve as reliable biomarkers of impending PRIS, if confirmed in future investigations with larger sample sizes.
Published Version: doi:10.1155/2014/346968
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4280802/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13890798
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