Beat‐to‐Beat Spatiotemporal Variability in the T Vector Is Associated With Sudden Cardiac Death in Participants Without Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Beat‐to‐Beat Spatiotemporal Variability in the T Vector Is Associated With Sudden Cardiac Death in Participants Without Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Beat‐to‐Beat Spatiotemporal Variability in the T Vector Is Associated With Sudden Cardiac Death in Participants Without Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study
Author: Waks, Jonathan W.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Henrikson, Charles A.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Han, Lichy; Agarwal, Sunil K.; Arking, Dan E.; Siscovick, David S.; Solomon, Scott D.; Post, Wendy S.; Josephson, Mark E.; Coresh, Josef; Tereshchenko, Larisa G.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Waks, J. W., E. Z. Soliman, C. A. Henrikson, N. Sotoodehnia, L. Han, S. K. Agarwal, D. E. Arking, et al. 2015. “Beat‐to‐Beat Spatiotemporal Variability in the T Vector Is Associated With Sudden Cardiac Death in Participants Without Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.” Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 4 (1): e001357. doi:10.1161/JAHA.114.001357. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.114.001357.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background: Despite advances in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, sudden cardiac death (SCD) remains a clinical challenge. Risk stratification in the general population is needed. Methods and Results: Beat‐to‐beat spatiotemporal variability in the T vector was measured as the mean angle between consecutive T‐wave vectors (mean TT′ angle) on standard 12‐lead ECGs in 14 024 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Subjects with left ventricular hypertrophy, atrial arrhythmias, frequent ectopy, ventricular pacing, or QRS duration ≥120 ms were excluded. The mean spatial TT′ angle was 5.21±3.55°. During a median of 14 years of follow‐up, 235 SCDs occurred (1.24 per 1000 person‐years). After adjustment for demographics, coronary heart disease risk factors, and known ECG markers for SCD, mean TT′ angle was independently associated with SCD (hazard ratio 1.089; 95% CI 1.044 to 1.137; P<0.0001). A mean TT′ angle >90th percentile (>9.57°) was associated with a 2‐fold increase in the hazard for SCD (hazard ratio 2.01; 95% CI 1.28 to 3.16; P=0.002). In a subgroup of patients with T‐vector amplitude ≥0.2 mV, the association with SCD was almost twice as strong (hazard ratio 3.92; 95% CI 1.91 to 8.05; P<0.0001). A significant interaction between mean TT′ angle and age was found: TT′ angle was associated with SCD in participants aged <55 years (hazard ratio 1.096; 95% CI 0.043 to 1.152; P<0.0001) but not in participants aged ≥55 years (Pinteraction=0.009). Conclusions: In a large, prospective, community‐based cohort of left ventricular hypertrophy–free participants, increased beat‐to‐beat spatiotemporal variability in the T vector, as assessed by increasing TT′ angle, was associated with SCD.
Published Version: doi:10.1161/JAHA.114.001357
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4330061/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:14065562
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters