Clumped Isotope Measurements of Small Carbonate Samples Using a High-Efficiency Dual-Reservoir Technique

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Clumped Isotope Measurements of Small Carbonate Samples Using a High-Efficiency Dual-Reservoir Technique

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Clumped Isotope Measurements of Small Carbonate Samples Using a High-Efficiency Dual-Reservoir Technique
Author: Petersen, Sierra Victoria; Schrag, Daniel P.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Petersen, Sierra Victoria, and Daniel P. Schrag. 2014. “Clumped Isotope Measurements of Small Carbonate Samples Using a High-Efficiency Dual-Reservoir Technique.” Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 28 (21): 2371–2381.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Rationale: The measurement of multiply substituted isotopologues of CO2 derived from carbonate has allowed the reconstruction of paleotemperatures from a single phase (CaCO3), circumventing uncertainty inherent in other isotopic paleothermometers. Traditional analytical techniques require relatively large amounts of carbonate (3–8 mg per replicate), which limits the applicability of the clumped isotope proxy to certain geological materials such as marine microfossils, commonly used for paleoclimate reconstructions. Methods: Clumped isotope ratio measurements of small samples were made on a new, high-efficiency, dual-reservoir sample-preparation inlet system attached to a Thermo-Finnigan MAT 253 mass spectrometer. Sample gas produced on the inlet is introduced from a 10 mL reservoir directly into the source via a capillary. Reference gas fills an identical 10 mL reservoir installed between the reference bellows and the capillary. The gas pressures in the two reservoirs are initially balanced, and are allowed to decrease together over the run. Results: Carbonate samples from 1 mg to 2.6 mg produced Δ47 values equivalent to those from the traditional two-bellows method with identical single-sample precision (1 SE = 0.005–0.015‰) and external standard error (SE = 0.006–0.015‰, n = 4–6). The size of sample needed to achieve good precision is controlled by the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer and the size of the fixed reservoirs and adjacent U-trap installed on our inlet. Conclusions: The high-precision clumped isotope measurements of small aliquots of carbonate obtained in this method allows for the application of this proxy to a wider range of geological sample materials, such as marine microfossils, that until now have been nearly impossible to analyze given sample size limitation.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/rcm.7022
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25279751
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:14117133
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters