Translational potential of olfactory mucosa for the study of neuropsychiatric illness

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Translational potential of olfactory mucosa for the study of neuropsychiatric illness

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Title: Translational potential of olfactory mucosa for the study of neuropsychiatric illness
Author: Borgmann-Winter, K; Willard, S L; Sinclair, D; Mirza, N; Turetsky, B; Berretta, S; Hahn, C-G

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Citation: Borgmann-Winter, K, S L Willard, D Sinclair, N Mirza, B Turetsky, S Berretta, and C-G Hahn. 2015. “Translational potential of olfactory mucosa for the study of neuropsychiatric illness.” Translational Psychiatry 5 (3): e527. doi:10.1038/tp.2014.141. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/tp.2014.141.
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Abstract: The olfactory mucosa (OM) is a unique source of regenerative neural tissue that is readily obtainable from living human subjects and thus affords opportunities for the study of psychiatric illnesses. OM tissues can be used, either as ex vivo OM tissue or in vitro OM-derived neural cells, to explore parameters that have been difficult to assess in the brain of living individuals with psychiatric illness. As OM tissues are distinct from brain tissues, an understanding of the neurobiology of the OM is needed to relate findings in these tissues to those of the brain as well as to design and interpret ex vivo or in vitro OM studies. To that end, we discuss the molecular, cellular and functional characteristics of cell types within the olfactory mucosa, describe the organization of the OM and highlight its role in the olfactory neurocircuitry. In addition, we discuss various approaches to in vitro culture of OM-derived cells and their characterization, focusing on the extent to which they reflect the in vivo neurobiology of the OM. Finally, we review studies of ex vivo OM tissues and in vitro OM-derived cells from individuals with psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. In particular, we discuss the concordance of this work with postmortem brain studies and highlight possible future approaches, which may offer distinct strengths in comparison to in vitro paradigms based on genomic reprogramming.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/tp.2014.141
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4354342/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:14351344
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