Managing Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Developing Countries: Tobacco Control, Cardiovascular Disease Risk Surveillance, and Diabetes Prevention

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Managing Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Developing Countries: Tobacco Control, Cardiovascular Disease Risk Surveillance, and Diabetes Prevention

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Title: Managing Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Developing Countries: Tobacco Control, Cardiovascular Disease Risk Surveillance, and Diabetes Prevention
Author: Feigl, Andrea B. ORCID  0000-0002-4298-981X
Citation: Feigl, Andrea B. 2015. Managing Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Developing Countries: Tobacco Control, Cardiovascular Disease Risk Surveillance, and Diabetes Prevention. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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Abstract: Non-communicable diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, and mental illnesses) and associated risk factors (unhealthy diets, physical inactivity, harmful use of alcohol, physical inactivity) are on the rise in developing countries, posing a threat to the health and financial systems of emerging economies.
In response, international organizations and Ministries of Health alike have started to tackle chronic diseases and associated risk factors with policies and treatment programs. Yet to this day, the body of evidence for best practices regarding the monitoring, prevention, and control of non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries remains small.
This doctoral thesis adds to this body of evidence. The first paper of my thesis assesses the impact of a national tobacco control program in high schools in Chile. Specifically, it evaluates the effectiveness and makes several policy recommendations based on the findings. My second dissertation paper assesses the modifying effect of a change in anti-retroviral treatment among HIV-positive subjects in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa on cardiovascular disease risk factors of high body mass index and high blood pressure. The third paper is based on a randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of a social-network-based diabetes and weight management program in Jordan.
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:16121160
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