Integrating Approaches to Privacy Across the Research Lifecycle: When Is Information Purely Public?

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Integrating Approaches to Privacy Across the Research Lifecycle: When Is Information Purely Public?

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Title: Integrating Approaches to Privacy Across the Research Lifecycle: When Is Information Purely Public?
Author: Gasser, Urs; O’Brien, David; Ullman, Jonathan; Altman, Micah; Bar-sinai, Michael; Nissim, Kobbi; Vadhan, Salil P.; Wojcik, Michael John; Wood, Alexandra B

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Citation: David R. O’Brien, Jonathan Ullman, Micah Altman, Urs Gasser, Michael Bar-Sinai, Kobbi Nissim, Salil Vadhan, Michael John Wojcik & Alexandra Wood, Integrating Approaches to Privacy Across the Research Lifecycle: When Is Information Purely Public? (Berkman Center Research Publication No. 2015-7, Mar. 29, 2015).
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Abstract: On September 24-25, 2013, the Privacy Tools for Sharing Research Data project at Harvard University held a workshop titled "Integrating Approaches to Privacy across the Research Data Lifecycle." Over forty leading experts in computer science, statistics, law, policy, and social science research convened to discuss the state of the art in data privacy research. The resulting conversations centered on the emerging tools and approaches from the participants’ various disciplines and how they should be integrated in the context of real-world use cases that involve the management of confidential research data.

Researchers are increasingly obtaining data from social networking websites, publicly-placed sensors, government records and other public sources. Much of this information appears public, at least to first impressions, and it is capable of being used in research for a wide variety of purposes with seemingly minimal legal restrictions. The insights about human behaviors we may gain from research that uses this data are promising. However, members of the research community are questioning the ethics of these practices, and at the heart of the matter are some difficult questions about the boundaries between public and private information. This workshop report, the second in a series, identifies selected questions and explores issues around the meaning of “public” in the context of using data about individuals for research purposes.
Other Sources: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2586158
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:16140637
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