Endogenous Levels of Circulating Androgens and Risk of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Among Women: A Nested Case–Control Study from the Nurses' Health Study Cohorts

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Endogenous Levels of Circulating Androgens and Risk of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Among Women: A Nested Case–Control Study from the Nurses' Health Study Cohorts

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Title: Endogenous Levels of Circulating Androgens and Risk of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Among Women: A Nested Case–Control Study from the Nurses' Health Study Cohorts
Author: Khalili, Hamed; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Konijeti, Gauree G.; Higuchi, Leslie M.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Richter, James M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Chan, Andrew T.

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Citation: Khalili, Hamed, Ashwin N. Ananthakrishnan, Gauree G. Konijeti, Leslie M. Higuchi, Charles S. Fuchs, James M. Richter, Shelley S. Tworoger, Susan E. Hankinson, and Andrew T. Chan. 2015. “Endogenous Levels of Circulating Androgens and Risk of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Among Women: A Nested Case–Control Study from the Nurses' Health Study Cohorts.” Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 21 (6): 1378-1385. doi:10.1097/MIB.0000000000000385. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MIB.0000000000000385.
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Abstract: Background: Androgens, which are known to be altered by exogenous hormone use, have recently been linked to alterations of the gut microbiome and mucosal immune function. No study has evaluated the association between circulating levels of androgens and risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study of women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II who provided a blood specimen. Cases of CD and UC were each matched to 2 controls. Prediagnosis plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone, and sex hormone–binding globulin were measured. We examined the association of each analyte with risk of CD or UC using conditional logistic regression models. Results: Compared with women in the lowest quintile of testosterone, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for CD were 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.39–1.90) for women in the second quintile, 0.49 (95% confidence interval, 0.21–1.15) for the third quartile, 0.22 (0.08–0.65) for the fourth quintile, and 0.39 (95% confidence interval, 0.16–0.99) for the highest quintile (Plinear trend = 0.004). In contrast, we did not observe a consistent association between prediagnostic testosterone and risk of UC (Plinear trend = 0.84). We also did not observe any association between plasma levels of sex hormone–binding globulin or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and risk of UC or CD (all Plinear trends > 0.10). Conclusions: Among women, prediagnostic circulating testosterone is associated with a lower risk of CD but not UC. Further studies to understand the biological mechanisms by which endogenous androgens may mediate the etiopathogenesis of CD are warranted.
Published Version: doi:10.1097/MIB.0000000000000385
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4437806/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17295536
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