Depression, Stress and Weight Loss in Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome in SHINE, a DPP Translation Study

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Depression, Stress and Weight Loss in Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome in SHINE, a DPP Translation Study

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Depression, Stress and Weight Loss in Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome in SHINE, a DPP Translation Study
Author: Trief, Paula M.; Cibula, Donald; Delahanty, Linda M.; Weinstock, Ruth S.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Trief, Paula M., Donald Cibula, Linda M. Delahanty, and Ruth S. Weinstock. 2014. “Depression, Stress and Weight Loss in Individuals with Metabolic Syndrome in SHINE, a DPP Translation Study.” Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 22 (12): 2532-2538. doi:10.1002/oby.20916. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.20916.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: OBJECTIVE To examine the relationships between elevated depression symptoms (EDS) or stress and weight loss in SHINE, a telephonic, primary-care based, translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program. DESIGN AND METHODS N=257 adults with metabolic syndrome were randomized to individual (IC) or group (CC) phone participation. We assessed weight, depression, anti-depressant use (ADMs), and stress (baseline, 6 months, 1 and 2 years). Univariate analyses used linear and logistic regression, t-tests for continuous variables and exact tests for categorical variables. Stratified analyses assessed modifiers of effects of depression/stress on weight loss. RESULTS Approximately 35% reported EDS, with no change over time. Approximately 28% of all participants used ADMs. Participants with EDS had lower mean % weight loss and a smaller % who achieved ≥ 5% weight loss. Participants with EDS were less likely to be “completers” (40.1 % vs. 61.5%, p=.002), coached (48.0% vs. 60.7%, p=.049), or log diet/activity (19.4% vs. 42.7%, p<.001), behaviors related to weight loss. Results were similar for high stress. ADM use had no independent effect on weight loss. CONCLUSIONS Individuals with metabolic syndrome and EDS and/or high stress were less likely to lose significant weight. Pre-intervention depression and stress screening to intervene may improve weight loss.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/oby.20916
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4236237/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17295792
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters