Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKlein-Rosenthal, Joyce Ellen
dc.contributor.authorSclar, Elliott D.
dc.contributor.authorKinney, Patrick L.
dc.contributor.authorKnowlton, Kim
dc.contributor.authorCrauderueff, Robert
dc.contributor.authorBrandt-Rauf, Paul W.
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-17T14:24:05Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationRosenthal, Joyce Klein, Elliott D. Sclar, Patrick L. Kinney, Kim Knowlton, Robert Crauderueff, and Paul W. Brandt-Rauf. 2007. Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore 36, no. 10: 834-846.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0304-4602en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17462976
dc.description.abstractGlobal climate change is expected to pose increasing challenges for cities in the following decades, placing greater stress and impacts on multiple social and biophysical systems, including population health, coastal development, urban infrastructure, energy demand, and water supplies. Simultaneously, a strong global trend towards urbanisation of poverty exists, with increased challenges for urban populations and local governance to protect and sustain the well-being of growing cities. In the context of these 2 overarching trends, interdisciplinary research at the city scale is prioritised for understanding the social impacts of climate change and variability and for the evaluation of strategies in the built environment that might serve as adaptive responses to climate change. This article discusses 2 recent initiatives of The Earth Institute at Columbia University (EI) as examples of research that integrates the methods and objectives of several disciplines, including environmental health science and urban planning, to understand the potential public health impacts of global climate change and mitigative measures for the more localised effects of the urban heat island in the New York City metropolitan region. These efforts embody 2 distinct research approaches. The New York Climate & Health Project created a new integrated modeling system to assess the public health impacts of climate and land use change in the metropolitan region. The Cool City Project aims for more applied policy-oriented research that incorporates the local knowledge of community residents to understand the costs and benefits of interventions in the built environment that might serve to mitigate the harmful impacts of climate change and variability, and protect urban populations from health stressors associated with summertime heat. Both types of research are potentially useful for understanding the impacts of environmental change at the urban scale, the policies needed to address these challenges, and to train scholars capable of collaborative approaches across the social and biophysical sciences.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcademy of Medicine, Singaporeen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.annals.edu.sg/pdf/36volno10oct2007/v36n10p834.pdfen_US
dc.relation.hasversionwww.researchgate.net/profile/Patrick_Kinney/publication/5860017_Links_between_the_built_environment_climate_and_population_health_interdisciplinary_environmental_change_research_in_New_York_City/file/79e4151489503cff6e.pdfen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.subjectAdaptationen_US
dc.subjectCitiesen_US
dc.subjectPlanningen_US
dc.subjectUrban heat islanden_US
dc.titleLinks between the Built Environment, Climate and Population Health: Interdisciplinary Environmental Change Research in New York Cityen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalAnnals of the Academy of Medicine, Singaporeen_US
dash.depositing.authorKlein-Rosenthal, Joyce Ellen
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedKlein-Rosenthal, Joyce Ellen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record