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dc.contributor.advisorShleifer, Andreien_US
dc.contributor.advisorRobinson, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAlesina, Albertoen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSimmons, Bethen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJohnston, Alastair I.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorWalt, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLada, Akosen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-17T16:29:39Z
dc.date.created2015-05en_US
dc.date.issued2015-05-18en_US
dc.date.submitted2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationLada, Akos. 2015. The Clash of Brothers: Wars to Avoid Diffusion in a Contagious World. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17464374
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation explores macro-level questions in Political Economy. Using the toolbox of Economics, I find a new reason for international conflict: cultural similarity. Two culturally similar nations may have very different political regimes (e.g. the two Koreas). The cultural similarity encourages citizens to compare the different political regimes, which in turn threatens a dictator. I formalize this process of political contagion in an infinitely-repeated bargaining model and show that more cultural similarity gives a politically-threatened dictator greater incentive to start a war against a democracy. The leader wants to ensure that his citizens see the other nation as an enemy rather than a role model. I test the implications of my model using cross-national statistical analysis, historical case studies, and text analysis. My cross-national statistical data set combines cultural similarity measures of up to 200x200 country pairs with data on wars among these nations between 1816 and 2008. In panel regressions which include country-pair fixed effects, I find that when two countries share culture (measured by religion, race, and civilization), but differ in their political institutions, they are up to 80 % more likely to fight a war. My results are stronger between physically distant country-pairs, which suggests that cultural affinity is not mismeasured physical proximity but a distinct factor in wars. I complement my analysis by considering an extension of my theory to domestic conflict, and by exploring the implications of wars creating shared identity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPolitical Economy and Governmenten_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Generalen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, Generalen_US
dc.titleThe Clash of Brothers: Wars to Avoid Diffusion in a Contagious Worlden_US
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_US
dash.depositing.authorLada, Akosen_US
dc.date.available2015-07-17T16:29:39Z
thesis.degree.date2015en_US
thesis.degree.grantorGraduate School of Arts & Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
thesis.degree.departmentPolitical Economy and Governmenten_US
dash.identifier.vireohttp://etds.lib.harvard.edu/gsas/admin/view/326en_US
dc.description.keywordswar, democracy, political economyen_US
dash.author.emailladaakos@gmail.comen_US
dash.identifier.drsurn-3:HUL.DRS.OBJECT:25164031en_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedLada, Akos


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