DNA barcode reference library for Iberian butterflies enables a continental-scale preview of potential cryptic diversity

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DNA barcode reference library for Iberian butterflies enables a continental-scale preview of potential cryptic diversity

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Title: DNA barcode reference library for Iberian butterflies enables a continental-scale preview of potential cryptic diversity
Author: Dincă, Vlad; Montagud, Sergio; Talavera, Gerard; Hernández-Roldán, Juan; Munguira, Miguel L.; García-Barros, Enrique; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Vila, Roger

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Citation: Dincă, Vlad, Sergio Montagud, Gerard Talavera, Juan Hernández-Roldán, Miguel L. Munguira, Enrique García-Barros, Paul D. N. Hebert, and Roger Vila. 2015. “DNA barcode reference library for Iberian butterflies enables a continental-scale preview of potential cryptic diversity.” Scientific Reports 5 (1): 12395. doi:10.1038/srep12395. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep12395.
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Abstract: How common are cryptic species - those overlooked because of their morphological similarity? Despite its wide-ranging implications for biology and conservation, the answer remains open to debate. Butterflies constitute the best-studied invertebrates, playing a similar role as birds do in providing models for vertebrate biology. An accurate assessment of cryptic diversity in this emblematic group requires meticulous case-by-case assessments, but a preview to highlight cases of particular interest will help to direct future studies. We present a survey of mitochondrial genetic diversity for the butterfly fauna of the Iberian Peninsula with unprecedented resolution (3502 DNA barcodes for all 228 species), creating a reliable system for DNA-based identification and for the detection of overlooked diversity. After compiling available data for European butterflies (5782 sequences, 299 species), we applied the Generalized Mixed Yule-Coalescent model to explore potential cryptic diversity at a continental scale. The results indicate that 27.7% of these species include from two to four evolutionary significant units (ESUs), suggesting that cryptic biodiversity may be higher than expected for one of the best-studied invertebrate groups and regions. The ESUs represent important units for conservation, models for studies of evolutionary and speciation processes, and sentinels for future research to unveil hidden diversity.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/srep12395
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4513295/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17820747
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