Neuroanatomy goes viral!

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Neuroanatomy goes viral!

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Title: Neuroanatomy goes viral!
Author: Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cepko, Constance L.; Born, Richard T.; Beier, Kevin T.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Nassi, Jonathan J., Constance L. Cepko, Richard T. Born, and Kevin T. Beier. 2015. “Neuroanatomy goes viral!.” Frontiers in Neuroanatomy 9 (1): 80. doi:10.3389/fnana.2015.00080. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnana.2015.00080.
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Abstract: The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist’s toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and extending the range of species that can be studied.
Published Version: doi:10.3389/fnana.2015.00080
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486834/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17820910
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