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dc.contributor.authorHemphill, Matthew Allen
dc.contributor.authorDabiri, Borna Esfahani
dc.contributor.authorGabriele, Sylvain
dc.contributor.authorKerscher, Lucas
dc.contributor.authorFranck, Christian
dc.contributor.authorGoss, Josue
dc.contributor.authorAlford, Patrick W.
dc.contributor.authorParker, Kevin Kit
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-10T16:55:14Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationHemphill, Matthew A., Borna E. Dabiri, Sylvain Gabriele, Lucas Kerscher, Christian Franck, Josue A. Goss, Patrick W. Alford, and Kevin Kit Parker. 2011. “A Possible Role for Integrin Signaling in Diffuse Axonal Injury.” Edited by Meni Wanunu. PLoS ONE 6 (7) (July 22): e22899. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0022899.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:17985222
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade, investigators have attempted to establish the pathophysiological mechanisms by which non-penetrating injuries damage the brain. Several studies have implicated either membrane poration or ion channel dysfunction pursuant to neuronal cell death as the primary mechanism of injury. We hypothesized that traumatic stimulation of integrins may be an important etiological contributor to mild Traumatic Brain Injury. In order to study the effects of forces at the cellular level, we utilized two hierarchical, in vitro systems to mimic traumatic injury to rat cortical neurons: a high velocity stretcher and a magnetic tweezer system. In one system, we controlled focal adhesion formation in neurons cultured on a stretchable substrate loaded with an abrupt, one dimensional strain. With the second system, we used magnetic tweezers to directly simulate the abrupt injury forces endured by a focal adhesion on the neurite. Both systems revealed variations in the rate and nature of neuronal injury as a function of focal adhesion density and direct integrin stimulation without membrane poration. Pharmacological inhibition of calpains did not mitigate the injury yet the inhibition of Rho-kinase immediately after injury reduced axonal injury. These data suggest that integrin-mediated activation of Rho may be a contributor to the diffuse axonal injury reported in mild Traumatic Brain Injury.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEngineering and Applied Sciencesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0022899en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectBrain damageen_US
dc.subjectCell membranesen_US
dc.subjectCytoskeletonen_US
dc.subjectFocal adhesionsen_US
dc.subjectIntegrinsen_US
dc.subjectNeuritesen_US
dc.subjectNeuronsen_US
dc.subjectTrauma medicineen_US
dc.titleA Possible Role for Integrin Signaling in Diffuse Axonal Injuryen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen_US
dash.depositing.authorParker, Kevin Kit
dc.date.available2015-08-10T16:55:14Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0022899*
dash.contributor.affiliatedHemphill, Matthew Allen
dash.contributor.affiliatedDabiri, Borna
dash.contributor.affiliatedGoss, Josue
dash.contributor.affiliatedParker, Kevin


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