A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints

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A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints

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Title: A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints
Author: Bennike, Tue; Ayturk, Ugur; Haslauer, Carla M.; Froehlich, John W.; Proffen, Benedikt L.; Barnaby, Omar; Birkelund, Svend; Murray, Martha M.; Warman, Matthew L.; Stensballe, Allan; Steen, Hanno

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Citation: Bennike, T., U. Ayturk, C. M. Haslauer, J. W. Froehlich, B. Proffen, O. Barnaby, S. Birkelund, et al. 2014. “A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints.” Journal of Proteome Research 13 (10): 4377-4387. doi:10.1021/pr500587x. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr500587x.
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Abstract: Synovial fluid in an articulating joint contains proteins derived from the blood plasma and proteins that are produced by cells within the joint tissues, such as synovium, cartilage, ligament, and meniscus. The proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid and the cellular origins of many synovial fluid components are not fully understood. Here, we present a normative proteomics study using porcine synovial fluid. Using our optimized method, we identified 267 proteins with high confidence in healthy synovial fluid. We also evaluated mRNA expression data from tissues that can contribute to the synovial fluid proteome, including synovium, cartilage, blood, and liver, to better estimate the relative contributions from these sources to specific synovial fluid components. We identified 113 proteins in healthy synovial fluid that appear to be primarily derived from plasma transudates, 37 proteins primarily derived from synovium, and 11 proteins primarily derived from cartilage. Finally, we compared the identified synovial fluid proteome to the proteome of human plasma, and we found that the two body fluids share many similarities, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. Knowing the synovial fluid proteome of a healthy joint will help to identify mechanisms that cause joint disease and pathways involved in disease progression.
Published Version: doi:10.1021/pr500587x
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4184458/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:21462451
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