Discriminating tissue stiffness with a haptic catheter: Feeling the inside of the beating heart

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Discriminating tissue stiffness with a haptic catheter: Feeling the inside of the beating heart

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Title: Discriminating tissue stiffness with a haptic catheter: Feeling the inside of the beating heart
Author: Kesner, Samuel Benjamin; Howe, Robert D.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Kesner, Samuel B., and Robert D. Howe. 2011. Discriminating tissue stiffness with a haptic catheter: Feeling the inside of the beating heart. In Proceedings of the 2011 Annual World Haptics Conference (WHC), Istanbul, Turkey, June 21-24, 2011: 13-18.
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Abstract: Catheter devices allow physicians to access the inside of the human body easily and painlessly through natural orifices and vessels. Although catheters allow for the delivery of fluids and drugs, the deployment of devices, and the acquisition of the measurements, they do not allow clinicians to assess the physical properties of tissue inside the body due to the tissue motion and transmission limitations of the catheter devices, including compliance, friction, and backlash. The goal of this research is to increase the tactile information available to physicians during catheter procedures by providing haptic feedback during palpation procedures. To accomplish this goal, we have developed the first motion compensated actuated catheter system that enables haptic perception of fast moving tissue structures. The actuated catheter is instrumented with a distal tip force sensor and a force feedback interface that allows users to adjust the position of the catheter while experiencing the forces on the catheter tip. The efficacy of this device and interface is evaluated through a psychophyisical study comparing how accurately users can differentiate various materials attached to a cardiac motion simulator using the haptic device and a conventional manual catheter. The results demonstrate that haptics improves a user's ability to differentiate material properties and decreases the total number of errors by 50% over the manual catheter system.
Published Version: doi:10.1109/WHC.2011.5945454
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:22113046
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