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dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Alicia D.
dc.contributor.authorBobo, Lawrence D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-15T16:57:34Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2015-08-06T11:28:22-04:00
dc.identifier.citationSimmons, A. D., and L. D. Bobo. 2015. “Can Non-Full-Probability Internet Surveys Yield Useful Data? A Comparison with Full-Probability Face-to-Face Surveys in the Domain of Race and Social Inequality Attitudes.” Sociological Methodology 45 (1) (March 11): 357–387. doi:10.1177/0081175015570096.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0081-1750en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:22565792
dc.description.abstractThe authors investigate the potential utility of Web-based surveys of non-full-probabilistically sampled respondents for social science research. Specifically, they compare demographic, attitude response, and multivariate model results produced by two distinct survey modalities: the traditional full-probability sample face-to-face survey and the non-full-probability Web survey. Using data from the 2009 Race Cues, Attitudes, and Punitiveness Survey (RCAPS), the 2008 General Social Survey (GSS), and the 2008 American National Election Study (ANES), the authors find that (1) the unweighted demographic differences between surveys tend to be slight; (2) in comparison with GSS and ANES respondents, RCAPS respondents are more interested in politics and ideologically polarized; (3) in comparison with ANES respondents, RCAPS respondents are more racially and socially conservative, often selecting the most extreme response option; (4) when the dependent variable is a more general and abstract measure of social attitudes, the multivariate models generated by the ANES and RCAPS show several differences that are trivial in magnitude, but when the dependent variable is a more specific and concrete measure, the models show remarkable similarity; and (5) RCAPS multivariate models consistently explain more variance than ANES models. Overall, these findings show both substantial similarities across the two survey modalities as well as a few clear, reasonably well-specified differences.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAfrican and African American Studiesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1177/0081175015570096en_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.titleCan Non-full-probability Internet Surveys Yield Useful Data? A Comparison with Full-probability Face-to-face Surveys in the Domain of Race and Social Inequality Attitudesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2015-08-06T15:28:50Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderSimmons, Alicia D. and Lawrence D. Bobo.
dc.relation.journalSociological Methodologyen_US
dash.depositing.authorBobo, Lawrence D.
dc.date.available2015-09-15T16:57:34Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0081175015570096*
dash.contributor.affiliatedBobo, Lawrence


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