In vivo Monitoring of Transcriptional Dynamics After Lower-Limb Muscle Injury Enables Quantitative Classification of Healing

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In vivo Monitoring of Transcriptional Dynamics After Lower-Limb Muscle Injury Enables Quantitative Classification of Healing

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Title: In vivo Monitoring of Transcriptional Dynamics After Lower-Limb Muscle Injury Enables Quantitative Classification of Healing
Author: Aguilar, Carlos A.; Shcherbina, Anna; Ricke, Darrell O.; Pop, Ramona; Carrigan, Christopher T.; Gifford, Casey A.; Urso, Maria L.; Kottke, Melissa A.; Meissner, Alexander

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Citation: Aguilar, Carlos A., Anna Shcherbina, Darrell O. Ricke, Ramona Pop, Christopher T. Carrigan, Casey A. Gifford, Maria L. Urso, Melissa A. Kottke, and Alexander Meissner. 2015. “In vivo Monitoring of Transcriptional Dynamics After Lower-Limb Muscle Injury Enables Quantitative Classification of Healing.” Scientific Reports 5 (1): 13885. doi:10.1038/srep13885. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep13885.
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Abstract: Traumatic lower-limb musculoskeletal injuries are pervasive amongst athletes and the military and typically an individual returns to activity prior to fully healing, increasing a predisposition for additional injuries and chronic pain. Monitoring healing progression after a musculoskeletal injury typically involves different types of imaging but these approaches suffer from several disadvantages. Isolating and profiling transcripts from the injured site would abrogate these shortcomings and provide enumerative insights into the regenerative potential of an individual’s muscle after injury. In this study, a traumatic injury was administered to a mouse model and healing progression was examined from 3 hours to 1 month using high-throughput RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq). Comprehensive dissection of the genome-wide datasets revealed the injured site to be a dynamic, heterogeneous environment composed of multiple cell types and thousands of genes undergoing significant expression changes in highly regulated networks. Four independent approaches were used to determine the set of genes, isoforms, and genetic pathways most characteristic of different time points post-injury and two novel approaches were developed to classify injured tissues at different time points. These results highlight the possibility to quantitatively track healing progression in situ via transcript profiling using high- throughput sequencing.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/srep13885
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4585378/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:22856829
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