Recognition of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms and knowledge about some other aspects of ASD among final year medical students in Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Recognition of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms and knowledge about some other aspects of ASD among final year medical students in Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Title: Recognition of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms and knowledge about some other aspects of ASD among final year medical students in Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa
Author: Bakare, M. O.; Tunde-Ayinmode, M. F.; Adewuya, A. O.; Bello-Mojeed, M. A.; Sale, S.; James, B. O.; Yunusa, M. A.; Obindo, J. T.; Igwe, M. N.; Odinka, P. C.; Okafor, C. J.; Oshodi, Y. O.; Okonoda, K. M.; Munir, K. M.; Orovwigho, A. O.

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Citation: Bakare, M. O., M. F. Tunde-Ayinmode, A. O. Adewuya, M. A. Bello-Mojeed, S. Sale, B. O. James, M. A. Yunusa, et al. 2015. “Recognition of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms and knowledge about some other aspects of ASD among final year medical students in Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa.” BMC Research Notes 8 (1): 454. doi:10.1186/s13104-015-1433-0. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-015-1433-0.
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Abstract: Background: Earlier studies suggest that knowledge about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) among healthcare workers in Nigeria is low. This present study assessed the knowledge of Nigerian final year medical students about symptoms of ASD and some other aspects of ASD. This is a cross sectional descriptive study that drew a total of seven hundred and fifty-seven (757) final year medical students from ten (10) randomly selected fully accredited medical schools out of a total of twenty-seven (27) fully accredited medical schools in Nigeria. Sociodemographic and Knowledge about Childhood Autism among Health Workers (KCAHW) questionnaires were used to assess knowledge of final year medical students about ASD and obtain demographic information. Results: Only few, 218 (28.8 %) of the 757 final year medical students had seen and participated in evaluation and management of at least a child with ASD during their clinical postings in pediatrics and psychiatry. Knowledge and recognition of symptoms of ASD is observed to be better among this group of final year medical students as shown by higher mean scores in the four domains of KCAHW questionnaire. Knowledge about ASD varies across gender and regions. Misconceptions about ASD were also observed among the final year medical students. Conclusions: More focus needs to be given to ASD in the curriculum of Nigerian undergraduate medical students, especially during their psychiatry and pediatric clinical postings. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13104-015-1433-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s13104-015-1433-0
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4574575/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:22857038
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