Modular Approach to Therapy for Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems in outpatient child and adolescent mental health services in New Zealand: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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Modular Approach to Therapy for Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems in outpatient child and adolescent mental health services in New Zealand: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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Title: Modular Approach to Therapy for Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems in outpatient child and adolescent mental health services in New Zealand: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Author: Lucassen, Mathijs F. G.; Stasiak, Karolina; Crengle, Sue; Weisz, John R.; Frampton, Christopher M. A.; Bearman, Sarah Kate; Ugueto, Ana M.; Herren, Jennifer; Cribb-Su’a, Ainsleigh; Faleafa, Monique; Kingi-’Ulu’ave, Denise; Loy, Jik; Scott, Rebecca M.; Hartdegen, Morgyn; Merry, Sally N.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Lucassen, M. F. G., K. Stasiak, S. Crengle, J. R. Weisz, C. M. A. Frampton, S. K. Bearman, A. M. Ugueto, et al. 2015. “Modular Approach to Therapy for Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems in outpatient child and adolescent mental health services in New Zealand: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.” Trials 16 (1): 457. doi:10.1186/s13063-015-0982-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-015-0982-9.
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Abstract: Background: Mental health disorders are common and disabling for young people because of the potential to disrupt key developmental tasks. Implementation of evidence-based psychosocial therapies in New Zealand is limited, owing to the inaccessibility, length, and cost of training in these therapies. Furthermore, most therapies address one problem area at a time, although comorbidity and changing clinical needs commonly occur in practice. A more flexible approach is needed. The Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) is designed to overcome these challenges; it provides a range of treatment modules addressing different problems, within a single training program. A clinical trial of MATCH-ADTC in the USA showed that MATCH-ADTC outperformed usual care and standard evidence-based treatment on several clinical measures. We aim to replicate these findings and evaluate the impact of providing training and supervision in MATCH-ADTC to: (1) improve clinical outcomes for youth attending mental health services; (2) increase the amount of evidence-based therapy content; (3) increase the efficiency of service delivery. Methods: This is an assessor-blinded multi-site effectiveness randomized controlled trial. Randomization occurs at two levels: (1) clinicians (≥60) are randomized to intervention or usual care; (2) youth participants (7–14 years old) accepted for treatment in child and adolescent mental health services (with a primary disorder that includes anxiety, depression, trauma-related symptoms, or disruptive behavior) are randomly allocated to receive MATCH-ADTC or usual care. Youth participants are recruited from ‘mainstream’, Māori-specific, and Pacific-specific child and adolescent mental health services. We originally planned to recruit 400 youth participants, but this has been revised to 200 participants. Centralized computer randomization ensures allocation concealment. The primary outcome measures are: (i) the difference in trajectory of change of clinical severity between groups (using the parent-rated Brief Problem Monitor); (ii) clinicians’ use of evidence-based treatment procedures during therapy sessions; (iii) total time spent by clinicians delivering therapy. Discussion If MATCH-ADTC demonstrates effectiveness it could offer a practical efficient method to increase access to evidence-based therapies, and improve outcomes for youth attending secondary care services. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000297628.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s13063-015-0982-9
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4603305/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23474057
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