Joint Effect of Genotypic and Phenotypic Features of Reproductive Factors on Endometrial Cancer Risk

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Joint Effect of Genotypic and Phenotypic Features of Reproductive Factors on Endometrial Cancer Risk

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Title: Joint Effect of Genotypic and Phenotypic Features of Reproductive Factors on Endometrial Cancer Risk
Author: Wang, Zhanwei; Risch, Harvey; Lu, Lingeng; Irwin, Melinda L.; Mayne, Susan; Schwartz, Peter; Rutherford, Thomas; De Vivo, Immaculata; Yu, Herbert

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Citation: Wang, Zhanwei, Harvey Risch, Lingeng Lu, Melinda L. Irwin, Susan Mayne, Peter Schwartz, Thomas Rutherford, Immaculata De Vivo, and Herbert Yu. 2015. “Joint Effect of Genotypic and Phenotypic Features of Reproductive Factors on Endometrial Cancer Risk.” Scientific Reports 5 (1): 15582. doi:10.1038/srep15582. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep15582.
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Abstract: Prolonged estrogen exposure is believed to be the major cause of endometrial cancer. As possible markers of estrogen exposure, various menstrual and reproductive features, e.g., ages at menarche and menopause, are found to be associated with endometrial cancer risk. In order to assess their combined effects on endometrial cancer, we created the total number of menstrual cycles (TNMC) that a woman experienced during her life or up to the time of study and two genetic risk scores, GRS1 for age at menarche and GRS2 for age at menopause. Comparing 482 endometrial cancer patients with 571 population controls, we found TNMC was associated with endometrial cancer risk and that the association remained statistically significant after adjustment for obesity and other potential confounders. Risk increased by about 2.5% for every additional 10 menstrual-cycles. The study also showed that high GRS1 was associated with increased risk. This relationship, however, was attenuated after adjustment for obesity. Our study further indicated women with high TNMC and GRS1 had twice the risk of endometrial cancer compared to those low in both indices. Our results provided additional support to the involvement of estrogen exposure in endometrial cancer risk with regard to genetic background and lifestyle features.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/srep15582
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4620445/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23474124
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