Association Between High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Total Stroke by Hypertensive Status Among Men

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Association Between High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Total Stroke by Hypertensive Status Among Men

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Title: Association Between High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Total Stroke by Hypertensive Status Among Men
Author: Jiménez, Monik C; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Glynn, Robert J; Ridker, Paul M; Gaziano, J Michael; Sesso, Howard D

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Citation: Jiménez, Monik C, Kathryn M Rexrode, Robert J Glynn, Paul M Ridker, J Michael Gaziano, and Howard D Sesso. 2015. “Association Between High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Total Stroke by Hypertensive Status Among Men.” Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease 4 (9): e002073. doi:10.1161/JAHA.115.002073. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.115.002073.
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Abstract: Background: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, may promote atherosclerosis, particularly among adults with elevated blood pressure; however, data are sparse. We examined the association between hsCRP concentrations and risk of total stroke by hypertension status (normotension, prehypertension, and hypertension) among men in the Physicians’ Health Study (PHS). Methods and Results: Blood samples were collected (1996–1997) and assayed for hsCRP among 10 456 initially healthy men from PHS I and PHS II and followed from 1997 to 2012. Self-reported hypertension status, cardiovascular risk factors, lifestyle, and alcohol consumption were obtained from the baseline questionnaire prior to randomization in PHS II. Strokes were updated approximately annually and confirmed by medical records according to the National Survey of Stroke criteria. Multivariable Cox models were used. We observed 395 incident total strokes over 115 791 person-years. In analyses adjusted for potential confounders and stroke risk factors, clinically elevated hsCRP (>3 mg/L) was associated with a 40% significantly greater hazard of total stroke compared with hsCRP <1 mg/L (hazard ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.87; Ptrend=0.01). Additional adjustment for blood pressure and biomarkers associated with cardiovascular risk marginally attenuated the estimates. Results were similar by hypertension status, although not statistically significant among normotensive and prehypertensive participants due to limited events. Conclusions: Elevated hsCRP levels were associated with a greater risk of total stroke, even after adjustment for potential confounders and cardiovascular risk factors. Risk of total stroke was significantly higher among hypertensive men with elevated hsCRP compared with normotensive men with low hsCRP.
Published Version: doi:10.1161/JAHA.115.002073
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4599494/pdf/
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Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23474128
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