Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces long-lasting changes in protein expression and histone acetylation

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Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces long-lasting changes in protein expression and histone acetylation

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Title: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces long-lasting changes in protein expression and histone acetylation
Author: Etiévant, Adeline; Manta, Stella; Latapy, Camille; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V.; Fecteau, Shirley; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

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Citation: Etiévant, Adeline, Stella Manta, Camille Latapy, Luiz Alexandre V. Magno, Shirley Fecteau, and Jean-Martin Beaulieu. 2015. “Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces long-lasting changes in protein expression and histone acetylation.” Scientific Reports 5 (1): 16873. doi:10.1038/srep16873. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep16873.
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Abstract: The use of non-invasive brain stimulation like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an increasingly popular set of methods with promising results for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Despite great enthusiasm, the impact of non-invasive brain stimulation on its neuronal substrates remains largely unknown. Here we show that rTMS applied over the frontal cortex of awaken mice induces dopamine D2 receptor dependent persistent changes of CDK5 and PSD-95 protein levels specifically within the stimulated brain area. Importantly, these modifications were associated with changes of histone acetylation at the promoter of these genes and prevented by administration of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275. These findings show that, like several other psychoactive treatments, repeated rTMS sessions can exert long-lasting effects on neuronal substrates. This underscores the need of understanding these effects in the development of future clinical applications as well as in the establishment of improved guidelines to use rTMS in non-medical settings.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/srep16873
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4653621/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23845137
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