Metabolic Characterization of Adults with Binge Eating in the General Population: The Framingham Heart Study

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Metabolic Characterization of Adults with Binge Eating in the General Population: The Framingham Heart Study

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Title: Metabolic Characterization of Adults with Binge Eating in the General Population: The Framingham Heart Study
Author: Abraham, Tobin M.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Hoffmann, D. Udo; Yanovski, Jack A.; Fox, Caroline S.

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Citation: Abraham, Tobin M., Joseph M. Massaro, D. Udo Hoffmann, Jack A. Yanovski, and Caroline S. Fox. 2014. “Metabolic Characterization of Adults with Binge Eating in the General Population: The Framingham Heart Study.” Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 22 (11): 2441-2449. doi:10.1002/oby.20867. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.20867.
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Abstract: OBJECTIVE To describe the metabolic profile of individuals with objective binge eating (OBE) and to evaluate whether associations between OBE and metabolic risk factors are mediated by body mass index (BMI). DESIGN AND METHODS Participants from the Framingham Heart Study, Third Generation and Omni 2 cohorts (n = 3551, 53.1% women, mean age 46.4 years) were screened for binge eating. We used multivariable-adjusted regression models to examine the associations of OBE with metabolic risk factors. RESULTS The prevalence of OBE was 4.8% in women and 4.9% in men. Compared to non-binge eating, OBE was associated with higher odds of hypertension (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.32–2.60), hypertriglyceridemia (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.01–2.01), low HDL (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.18–2.44), insulin resistance (OR 3.18, 95% CI 2.25–4.50) and metabolic syndrome (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.94–3.90). Fasting glucose was 7.2 mg/dl higher in those with OBE (p=0.0001). Individuals with OBE had more visceral, subcutaneous and liver fat. Most of these associations were attenuated with adjustment for BMI, with the exception of fasting glucose. CONCLUSIONS Binge eating is associated with a high burden of metabolic risk factors. Much of the associated risk appears to be mediated by BMI, with the exception of fasting glucose.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/oby.20867
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4224974/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23845201
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