Qualitative analysis of vendor discussions on the procurement of Computerised Physician Order Entry and Clinical Decision Support systems in hospitals

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Qualitative analysis of vendor discussions on the procurement of Computerised Physician Order Entry and Clinical Decision Support systems in hospitals

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Qualitative analysis of vendor discussions on the procurement of Computerised Physician Order Entry and Clinical Decision Support systems in hospitals
Author: Cresswell, Kathrin M; Lee, Lisa; Slee, Ann; Coleman, Jamie; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Cresswell, Kathrin M, Lisa Lee, Ann Slee, Jamie Coleman, David W Bates, and Aziz Sheikh. 2015. “Qualitative analysis of vendor discussions on the procurement of Computerised Physician Order Entry and Clinical Decision Support systems in hospitals.” BMJ Open 5 (10): e008313. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008313. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008313.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Objectives: We studied vendor perspectives about potentially transferable lessons for implementing organisations and national strategies surrounding the procurement of Computerised Physician Order Entry (CPOE)/Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems in English hospitals. Setting: Data were collected from digitally audio-recorded discussions from a series of CPOE/CDS vendor round-table discussions held in September 2014 in the UK. Participants: Nine participants, representing 6 key vendors operating in the UK, attended. The discussions were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results: Vendors reported a range of challenges surrounding the procurement and contracting processes of CPOE/CDS systems, including hospitals’ inability to adequately assess their own needs and then select a suitable product, rushed procurement and implementation processes that resulted in difficulties in meaningfully engaging with vendors, as well as challenges relating to contracting leading to ambiguities in implementation roles. Consequently, relationships between system vendors and hospitals were often strained, the vendors attributing this to a lack of hospital management's appreciation of the complexities associated with implementation efforts. Future anticipated challenges included issues surrounding the standardisation of data to enable their aggregation across systems for effective secondary uses, and implementation of data exchange with providers outside the hospital. Conclusions: Our results indicate that there are significant issues surrounding capacity to procure and optimise CPOE/CDS systems among UK hospitals. There is an urgent need to encourage more synergistic and collaborative working between providers and vendors and for a more centralised support for National Health Service hospitals, which draws on a wider body of experience, including a formalised procurement framework with value-based product specifications.
Published Version: doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008313
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636661/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23845357
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters