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dc.contributor.authorSiddiqi, Arjumanden_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Rashidaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Quynh C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLoopstra, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorKawachi, Ichiroen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-04T18:15:44Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationSiddiqi, Arjumand, Rashida Brown, Quynh C. Nguyen, Rachel Loopstra, and Ichiro Kawachi. 2015. “Cross-national comparison of socioeconomic inequalities in obesity in the United States and Canada.” International Journal for Equity in Health 14 (1): 116. doi:10.1186/s12939-015-0251-2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12939-015-0251-2.en
dc.identifier.issn1475-9276en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23845365
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Prior cross-national studies of socioeconomic inequalities in obesity have only compared summary indices of inequality but not specific, policy-relevant dimensions of inequality: (a) shape of the socioeconomic gradient in obesity, (b) magnitude of differentials in obesity across socioeconomic levels and, (c) level of obesity at any given socioeconomic level. We use unique data on two highly comparable societies – U.S. and Canada - to contrast each of these inequality dimensions. Methods: Data came from the 2002/2003 Joint Canada/U.S. Survey of Health. We calculated adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) for obesity (compared to normal weight) by income quintile and education group separately for both nations and, between Canadians and Americans in the same income or education group. Results: In the U.S., every socioeconomic group except the college educated had significant excess prevalence of obesity. By contrast in Canada, only those with less than high school were worse off, suggesting that the shape of the socioeconomic gradient differs in the two countries. U.S. differentials between socioeconomic levels were also larger than in Canada (e.g., PR quintile 1 compared to quintile 5 was 1.82 in the U.S. [95 % CI: 1.52-2.19] but 1.45 in Canada [95 % CI: 1.10-1.91]). At the lower end of the socioeconomic gradient, obesity was more prevalent in the U.S. than in Canada. Conclusions: Our results suggest there is variation between U.S. and Canada in different dimensions of socioeconomic inequalities in obesity. Future research should examine a broader set of nations and test whether specific policies or environmental exposures can explain these differences.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/s12939-015-0251-2en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4628298/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectSocioeconomic statusen
dc.subjectHealth inequalitiesen
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectCanadaen
dc.subjectUnited Statesen
dc.titleCross-national comparison of socioeconomic inequalities in obesity in the United States and Canadaen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalInternational Journal for Equity in Healthen
dash.depositing.authorKawachi, Ichiroen_US
dc.date.available2015-12-04T18:15:44Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12939-015-0251-2*
dash.contributor.affiliatedKawachi, Ichiro


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