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dc.contributor.authorBoland, Genevieve M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPiha-Paul, Sarina A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSubbiah, Viveken_US
dc.contributor.authorRoutbort, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorHerbrich, Shelley M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBaggerly, Keithen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Keyur P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrusco, Laurenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorombe, Chachaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNaing, Aungen_US
dc.contributor.authorFu, Siqingen_US
dc.contributor.authorHong, David S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJanku, Filipen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Amberen_US
dc.contributor.authorBroaddus, Russellen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuthra, Rajaen_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Kennaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMendelsohn, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorMills, Gordon B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMeric-Bernstam, Fundaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T19:23:29Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationBoland, G. M., S. A. Piha-Paul, V. Subbiah, M. Routbort, S. M. Herbrich, K. Baggerly, K. P. Patel, et al. 2015. “Clinical next generation sequencing to identify actionable aberrations in a phase I program.” Oncotarget 6 (24): 20099-20110.en
dc.identifier.issn1949-2553en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23993547
dc.description.abstractPurpose We determined the frequency of recurrent hotspot mutations in 46 cancer-related genes across tumor histologies in patients with advanced cancer. Methods: We reviewed data from 500 consecutive patients who underwent genomic profiling on an IRB-approved prospective clinical protocol in the Phase I program at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Archival tumor DNA was tested for 740 hotspot mutations in 46 genes (Ampli-Seq Cancer Panel; Life Technologies, CA). Results: Of the 500 patients, 362 had at least one reported mutation/variant. The most common likely somatic mutations were within TP53 (36%), KRAS (11%), and PIK3CA (9%) genes. Sarcoma (20%) and kidney (30%) had the lowest proportion of likely somatic mutations detected, while pancreas (100%), colorectal (89%), melanoma (86%), and endometrial (75%) had the highest. There was high concordance in 62 patients with paired primary tumors and metastases analyzed. 151 (30%) patients had alterations in potentially actionable genes. 37 tumor types were enrolled; both rare actionable mutations in common tumor types and actionable mutations in rare tumor types were identified. Conclusion: Multiplex testing in the CLIA environment facilitates genomic characterization across multiple tumor lineages and identification of novel opportunities for genotype-driven trials.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherImpact Journals LLCen
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4652990/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectgenomic sequencingen
dc.subjectactionable genesen
dc.titleClinical next generation sequencing to identify actionable aberrations in a phase I programen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalOncotargeten
dash.depositing.authorBoland, Genevieve M.en_US
dc.date.available2016-01-04T19:23:29Z
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedBoland, Genevieve


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