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dc.contributor.authorWhaley, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorReed, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, Vickien_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T19:23:36Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationWhaley, Christopher, Mary Reed, John Hsu, and Vicki Fung. 2015. “Functional Limitations, Medication Support, and Responses to Drug Costs among Medicare Beneficiaries.” PLoS ONE 10 (12): e0144236. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0144236. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0144236.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23993566
dc.description.abstractObjective: Standard Medicare Part D prescription drug benefits include substantial and complex cost-sharing. Many beneficiaries also have functional limitations that could affect self-care capabilities, including managing medications, but also have varying levels of social support to help with these activities. We examined the associations between drug cost responses, functional limitations, and social support. Data Sources and Study Setting We conducted telephone interviews in a stratified random sample of community-dwelling Medicare Advantage beneficiaries (N = 1,201, response rate = 70.0%). Participants reported their functional status (i.e., difficulty with activities of daily living) and social support (i.e., receiving help with medications). Drug cost responses included cost-reducing behaviors, cost-related non-adherence, and financial stress. Study Design We used multivariate logistic regression to assess associations among functional status, help with medications, and drug cost responses, adjusting for patient characteristics. Principal Findings Respondents with multiple limitations who did not receive help with their medications were more likely to report cost-related non-adherence (OR = 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2–8.5) and financial stress (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3–4.5) compared to subjects with fewer limitations and no help; however, those with multiple limitations and with medication help had similar odds of unfavorable cost responses as those with fewer limitations. Conclusion: The majority of beneficiaries with functional limitations did not receive help with medications. Support with medication management for beneficiaries who have functional limitations could improve adherence and outcomes.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0144236en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4671661/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.titleFunctional Limitations, Medication Support, and Responses to Drug Costs among Medicare Beneficiariesen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorHsu, Johnen_US
dc.date.available2016-01-04T19:23:36Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0144236*
dash.contributor.affiliatedFung, Vicki
dash.contributor.affiliatedHsu, John


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