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dc.contributor.authorBaskin-Sommers, Arielle R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHooley, Jill M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDahlgren, Mary K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGönenc, Atillaen_US
dc.contributor.authorYurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGruber, Staci A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T19:24:13Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationBaskin-Sommers, Arielle R., Jill M. Hooley, Mary K. Dahlgren, Atilla Gönenc, Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd, and Staci A. Gruber. 2015. “Elevated Preattentive Affective Processing in Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder: A Preliminary fMRI Study.” Frontiers in Psychology 6 (1): 1866. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01866. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01866.en
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:23993624
dc.description.abstractBackground: Emotion dysregulation is central to the clinical conceptualization of borderline personality disorder (BPD), with individuals often displaying instability in mood and intense feelings of negative affect. Although existing data suggest important neural and behavioral differences in the emotion processing of individuals with BPD, studies thus far have only explored reactions to overt emotional information. Therefore, it is unclear if BPD-related emotional hypersensitivity extends to stimuli presented below the level of conscious awareness (preattentively). Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure neural responses to happy, angry, fearful, and neutral faces presented preattentively, using a backward masked affect paradigm. Given their tendency toward emotional hyperreactivity and altered amygdala and frontal activation, we hypothesized that individuals with BPD would demonstrate a distinct pattern of fMRI responses relative to those without BPD during the viewing of masked affective versus neutral faces in specific regions of interests (ROIs). Results: Results indicated that individuals with BPD demonstrated increases in frontal, cingulate, and amygdalar activation represented by number of voxels activated and demonstrated a different pattern of activity within the ROIs relative to those without BPD while viewing masked affective versus neutral faces. Conclusion: These findings suggest that in addition to the previously documented heightened responses to overt displays of emotion, individuals with BPD also demonstrate differential responses to positive and negative emotions, early in the processing stream, even before conscious awareness.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01866en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4667012/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectborderline personality disorderen
dc.subjectemotionen
dc.subjectbackward masked affecten
dc.subjectpreattentiveen
dc.titleElevated Preattentive Affective Processing in Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder: A Preliminary fMRI Studyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen
dash.depositing.authorHooley, Jill M.en_US
dc.date.available2016-01-04T19:24:13Z
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01866*
dash.contributor.affiliatedGonenc, Atilla
dash.contributor.affiliatedGruber, Staci
dash.contributor.affiliatedHooley, Jill


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