Design and Assembly of an Ultra-light Motorized Microdrive for Chronic Neural Recordings in Small Animals

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Design and Assembly of an Ultra-light Motorized Microdrive for Chronic Neural Recordings in Small Animals

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Title: Design and Assembly of an Ultra-light Motorized Microdrive for Chronic Neural Recordings in Small Animals
Author: Otchy, Timothy Matthew; Olveczky, Bence P

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Citation: Otchy, Timothy Matthew, and Bence P. Olveczky, 2012. “Design and Assembly of an Ultra-light Motorized Microdrive for Chronic Neural Recordings in Small Animals.” Journal of Visualized Experiments (69) (November 8): e4314. doi:10.3791/4314.
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Abstract: The ability to chronically record from populations of neurons in freely behaving animals has proven an invaluable tool for dissecting the function of neural circuits underlying a variety of natural behaviors, including navigation, decision making, and the generation of complex motor sequences. Advances in precision machining has allowed for the fabrication of light-weight devices suitable for chronic recordings in small animals, such as mice and songbirds. The ability to adjust the electrode position with small remotely controlled motors has further increased the recording yield in various behavioral contexts by reducing animal handling. Here we describe a protocol to build an ultra-light motorized microdrive for long-term chronic recordings in small animals. Our design evolved from an earlier published version7, and has been adapted for ease-of use and cost-effectiveness to be more practical and accessible to a wide array of researchers. This proven design allows for fine, remote positioning of electrodes over a range of ~ 5 mm and weighs less than 750 mg when fully assembled. We present the complete protocol for how to build and assemble these drives, including 3D CAD drawings for all custom microdrive components.
Published Version: doi:10.3791/4314
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23169237
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:25277893
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