Socioeconomic status is associated with reduced lung function in China: an analysis from a large cross-sectional study in Shanghai

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Socioeconomic status is associated with reduced lung function in China: an analysis from a large cross-sectional study in Shanghai

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Socioeconomic status is associated with reduced lung function in China: an analysis from a large cross-sectional study in Shanghai
Author: Gaffney, Adam W.; Hang, Jing-qing; Lee, Mi-Sun; Su, Li; Zhang, Feng-ying; Christiani, David C.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Gaffney, Adam W., Jing-qing Hang, Mi-Sun Lee, Li Su, Feng-ying Zhang, and David C. Christiani. 2016. “Socioeconomic status is associated with reduced lung function in China: an analysis from a large cross-sectional study in Shanghai.” BMC Public Health 16 (1): 96. doi:10.1186/s12889-016-2752-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-2752-3.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background: An inverse association between socioeconomic status and pulmonary function has emerged in many studies. However, the mediating factors in this relationship are poorly understood, and might be expected to differ between countries. We sought to investigate the relationship between socioeconomic status and lung function in China, a rapidly industrializing nation with unique environmental challenges, and to identify potentially-modifiable environmental mediators. Methods: We used data from the Shanghai Putuo Study, a cross-sectional study performed in Shanghai, China. Participants completed a questionnaire and spirometry. The primary exposure was socioeconomic status, determined by education level. The primary outcomes were FEV1 and FVC percent predicted. Multiple linear regressions were used to test this association, and the percent explained by behavioral, environmental, occupational, and dietary variables was determined by adding these variables to a base model. Results: The study population consisted of a total of 22,878 study subjects that were 53.3 % female and had a mean age of 48. In the final multivariate analysis, the effect estimates for FEV1 and FVC percent predicted for low socioeconomic status (compared to high) were statistically significant at a p-value of <0.01. Smoking, biomass exposure, mode of transportation to work, a diet low in fruits or vegetables, and occupational category partially attenuated the relationship between SES and lung function. In a fully-adjusted age-stratified analysis, the socioeconomic disparity in lung function widened with increasing age. Conclusions: We found cross-sectional evidence of socioeconomic disparities in pulmonary function in Shanghai. These differences increased with age and were partially explained by potentially modifiable exposures.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/s12889-016-2752-3
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4736183/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:25658541
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters