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dc.contributor.authorKim, Sujinen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Yongjooen_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Sang Minen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-01T19:51:14Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.citationKim, Sujin, Yongjoo Kim, and Sang Min Park. 2016. “Body Mass Index and Decline of Cognitive Function.” PLoS ONE 11 (2): e0148908. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0148908. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0148908.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:25658542
dc.description.abstractBackground: The association between body mass index (BMI) and cognitive function is a public health issue. This study investigated the relationship between obesity and cognitive impairment which was assessed by the Korean version of the Mini-mental state examination (K-MMSE) among mid- and old-aged people in South Korea. Methods: A cohort of 5,125 adults, age 45 or older with normal cognitive function (K-MMSE≥24) at baseline (2006), was derived from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA) 2006~2012. The association between baseline BMI and risk of cognitive impairment was assessed using multiple logistic regression models. We also assessed baseline BMI and change of cognitive function over the 6-year follow-up using multiple linear regressions. Results: During the follow-up, 358 cases of severe cognitive impairment were identified. Those with baseline BMI≥25 kg/m2 than normal-weight (18.5≤BMI<23 kg/m2) were marginally less likely to experience the development of severe cognitive impairment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.52 to 1.03; Ptrend = 0.03). This relationship was stronger among female (aOR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.40 to 1.00; Ptrend = 0.01) and participants with low-normal K-MMSE score (MMSE: 24–26) at baseline (aOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.35 to 0.98; Ptrend<0.01). In addition, a slower decline of cognitive function was observed in obese individuals than those with normal weight, especially among women and those with low-normal K-MMSE score at baseline. Conclusion: In this nationally representative study, we found that obesity was associated with lower risk of cognitive decline among mid- and old-age population.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0148908en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4751283/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen
dc.subjectCognitive Scienceen
dc.subjectCognitive Neuroscienceen
dc.subjectCognitive Neurologyen
dc.subjectCognitive Impairmenten
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectNeurologyen
dc.subjectPhysiologyen
dc.subjectPhysiological Parametersen
dc.subjectBody Weighten
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectBody Mass Indexen
dc.subjectMental Health and Psychiatryen
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectPeople and Placesen
dc.subjectPopulation Groupingsen
dc.subjectAge Groupsen
dc.subjectAdultsen
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectHealth Economicsen
dc.subjectHealth Insuranceen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectVascular Dementiaen
dc.subjectGeographical Locationsen
dc.subjectAsiaen
dc.titleBody Mass Index and Decline of Cognitive Functionen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorKim, Yongjooen_US
dc.date.available2016-03-01T19:51:14Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0148908*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedPark, Sang
dash.contributor.affiliatedKim, Yongjoo


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