Clinical Characteristics Associated with Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Tuboovarian Abscesses

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Clinical Characteristics Associated with Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Tuboovarian Abscesses

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Title: Clinical Characteristics Associated with Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Tuboovarian Abscesses
Author: Farid, Huma; Lau, Trevin C.; Karmon, Anatte E.; Styer, Aaron K.

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Citation: Farid, Huma, Trevin C. Lau, Anatte E. Karmon, and Aaron K. Styer. 2016. “Clinical Characteristics Associated with Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Tuboovarian Abscesses.” Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology 2016 (1): 5120293. doi:10.1155/2016/5120293. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5120293.
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Abstract: Objective:. Although parenteral antibiotic treatment is a standard approach for tuboovarian abscesses, a significant proportion of patients fail therapy and require interventional radiology (IR) guided drainage. The objective of this study is to assess if specific clinical factors are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. Study Design. Retrospective medical record review of patients hospitalized for tuboovarian abscesses from 2001 through 2012 was performed. Clinical characteristics were compared for patients who underwent successful parenteral antibiotic treatment, failed antibiotic treatment necessitating subsequent IR drainage, initial drainage with concurrent antibiotics, and surgery. Results. One hundred thirteen patients admitted for inpatient treatment were identified. Sixty-one (54%) patients were treated with antibiotics alone. Within this group, 24.6% failed antibiotic treatment and required drainage. Mean white blood cell count (K/μL) (18.7 ± 5.94 versus 13.9 ± 5.12) (p = 0.003), mean maximum diameter of tuboovarian abscess (cm) (6.8 ± 2.9 versus 5.2 ± 2.0) (p = 0.03), and length of stay (days) (9.47 ± 7.43 versus 4.59 ± 2.4) (p = 0.002) were significantly greater for patients who failed antibiotic treatment. Conclusions. Admission white blood cell count greater than 16 K/μL and abscess size greater than 5.18 cm are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. These factors may provide guidance for initial selection of IR guided drainage.
Published Version: doi:10.1155/2016/5120293
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4773533/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:26318650
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